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#1
I hope taking it out of context doesn't make it too difficult to understand what I am asking for, but lately I've seen it used(もん), mostly at the end of a sentence and I think more for effect and/or emphasis for a true translation.

I haven't really noticed it before now, or actually, never gave it much thought... but now I am curious, could someone explain this to me in detail? ^.^

Thank you, thank you.

-Aya
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#2
<!--quoteo(post=192701:date=Sep 26 2007, 06:23 AM:name=aya)-->QUOTE(aya @ Sep 26 2007, 06:23 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->I hope taking it out of context doesn't make it too difficult to understand what I am asking for, but lately I've seen it used(もん), mostly at the end of a sentence and I think more for effect and/or emphasis for a true translation.

I haven't really noticed it before now, or actually, never gave it much thought... but now I am curious, could someone explain this to me in detail? ^.^

Thank you, thank you.

-Aya<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

You mean like そうだもん or ちがうもん. It's a contraction of もの (which can also be used in polite form -- そうですもの), and adds emphasis with a bit of a nuance of "you may not think so, but as far as I'm concerned..." And it's strictly for children and girls. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blush21.gif[/img]

A bit like "yup" and "nope" (compared to "yes/no") or a "Well,..." at the start of a sentence. Literally, you might translate it as "indeed", but no kid or girl would ever say that, right?

I shall serve no fries before their time.
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#3
Very good explanation! [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/clap.gif[/img]

You'd often begin with "だって" and end in "だもん" for extra emphasis in a (cute, submissive) counter-argument.
I'd love to see a politician use it [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif[/img]
だって不景気だもん![img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/down.gif[/img]
Make every moment count!
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#4
<!--quoteo(post=192722:date=Sep 25 2007, 10:37 PM:name=danielyuki)-->QUOTE(danielyuki @ Sep 25 2007, 10:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Very good explanation! [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/clap.gif[/img]

You'd often begin with "だって" and end in "だもん" for extra emphasis in a (cute, submissive) counter-argument.
I'd love to see a politician use it [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif[/img]
だって不景気だもん![img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/down.gif[/img]<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Aa, I think I may understand. So, "mo" is simply a partical, isn't it? If I had seperated 'mo' and 'n' I think I would have understood. 'Mo' and 'n' can be used for emphasis apart from eachother too, am I right?
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#5
Ah, it's not the same as the particle も. The word is もの, which gets shortened into もん in casual speech. も by itself as a particle is used to mean "and/also," which, I suppose, depending on the context could be used to emphasize certain things (「彼は行きますが、私も行きます」 here, you are emphasizing that you are going as well). But, もの is always used as a single unit.
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