Poll: Do you use your Japanese parent's name and your birth name on meishi?
I use my given name only.
I use my mother's Japanese maiden name.
I use my father's Japanese name.
I use my mother's (not Japanese) maiden name
I use another family name.
I use the Japanese name before the non-Japanese last name.
I use the non-Japanese name before the Japanese name.
I use my born name only, even though it does not indicate any Japanese.
I use my Japanese name only, even though it does not indicate my other family lineage.
I use my First, middle, and Last name only.
I never indicate that I am part Japanese to avoid confusion in Euro-Caucasian cultures.
I never indicate that I am part from another non-Japanese culture.
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めいし -おなまえ わしい
#1
Check as many boxes as are applicable to you in the above poll.


[Image: blush21.gif]

I'm making up my biz. card, mostly for U.S. use (though it may go around a small group of Japanese). I'm unsure what the best "Halvsie" way is to handle the use of the Japanese family name.


I have written なまえ・ my name line that reads :

<!--sizeo:4--><!--/sizeo-->菊地<!--sizec--><!--/sizec--> (の) 二ール アンジラ

Is the use of の acceptable or inappropriate? Í haven't seen anything that handles this matter.
I'm wondering what other Halvsies do in this situation.
[color="#dddd00"][center][size="1"][/size] [/center][center][size="1"]"for Zen's belief in Sudden illumination, a fleeting glimpse of existence just as it really is."[/size][/center][/color]
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#2
Your business card should have your legal name.
I have no need for a business card so I have not made any; however, on my resume my name is: Taro (firstname) Yamada (middle name, which is my mother's name) Smith (father's name).

"No" is not so much inappropriate, but incorrect.
You would just write, Kikuchi Nial (sp?) Angela.
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#3
<!--quoteo(post=182779:date=May 20 2007, 11:03 PM:name=Marisuke)-->QUOTE(Marisuke @ May 20 2007, 11:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Your business card should have your legal name.
I have no need for a business card so I have not made any; however, on my resume my name is: Taro (firstname) Yamada (middle name, which is my mother's name) Smith (father's name).

"No" is not so much inappropriate, but incorrect.
You would just write, Kikuchi Nial (sp?) Angela.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

You have a really nice sounding name! Taro Yamada Smith.
Thanks for the input Marisuke. The no was there as a gesture, whether one read it as posessive or as another dumb cross-cultural denial of myself. grrrr。
I think you may be correct that I should remove it.
I debated putting the K in the neale as a hard sound that was eliminated by my performing Great grandmother as being too Irish sounding,,,. クニール。
Among other things... And, I still feel like my name and permanent address are a sick joke when translated.

I wonder if anyone else has had this tyぺ おふ problem. Or shares my sentiment with bi-lingual puns.
I thought it looked cute in the braces...like a little noh moon.

Anyway... back to reality.

あんじょー
あんじ 
くに いる
にーる
A.K.

Oko_ne
[color="#dddd00"][center][size="1"][/size] [/center][center][size="1"]"for Zen's belief in Sudden illumination, a fleeting glimpse of existence just as it really is."[/size][/center][/color]
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#4
My given English name is all I use on my meishi. I have a Japanese name (my middle name), but nobody uses it, so I don't bother. Though, since my name is fairly hard to pronounce by Japanese, I often debate switching to my Japanese name and use my mom's maiden name =\

It's particularly a pain in the ass when calling headquarters in Tokyo. Just about everyone there knows me, but it usually takes a few tries before they realize who it is they are talking to and get my name right...
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#5
Hapacheese, you sound like you are quite successful.
I remember meeting someone who is a foreigner here and he said that the office he called would identify him by the state that he was calling from.

I sent my dual-sided color meishi to the printer.
Though, I still feel a bit odd writing 持ち 主 for my small business. Though I felt more awkward writing President.

Today I was looking online, seeing another meishi where someone had 3 different small businesses on 1 meishi. So, I'm thinking I have at least 1 more meishi to go for my other 2 businesses, or just ordering the standard biz. cards and creating 1 more.

I'm exhausted. Japanese salary men are so lucky to have 1 employer, and seem to never worry about pay!
[color="#dddd00"][center][size="1"][/size] [/center][center][size="1"]"for Zen's belief in Sudden illumination, a fleeting glimpse of existence just as it really is."[/size][/center][/color]
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#6
Working for a corporation has the benefit of stability (or the illusion of stability, depending on where you work). When you know you've got a giant corporate structure supporting the system, little issues are less likely to cause something so dramatic as to leave you on the street without a job. Not always the case, but certainly less so than being self-employed.

I, too, identify myself by what branch I am calling from, then state my name. The problem is that when I say, 「おはようございます。(会社名)アメリカの(自分の名前)です。」 (Ohayougozaimasu. (Company name) America no (my name) desu), they don't expect it... at least, not in Japanese. So, it throws them for yet another loop, which makes things all the more of a pain in the ass. Not to mention we don't get dual-sided business cards, so I can't have my name written in Japanese, so when I meet new clients/associates/whatever, I have to spent extra time teaching them how to pronounce my name. Ah well, what can you do?
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#7
on my business card i have my name in english and then my name in katakana below it...

in my previous job, I had a double sided card.. one side all in english, the other side all in Japanese..
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