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Itadakimasu Translation Challenge
#1
How would you translate いただきます ?

(いただきます = itadakimasu)
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#2
"I am going to have it?" [Image: unsure.gif]

damn!!! this is actually hard, ne?!!!!!!

Its far from bon apetite... wow... how about gotsushosama deshita?... thats even worse!!
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#3
Gochisousama is easier, I think. It can be translated as "thank you" or "that was nice".

Itadakimasu: "two, four, six, eight, dig in, don't wait"
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#4
Announcement? I'm going to eat my food now...?
If ignorance is bliss then I'd rather be miserable....
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#5
bonappetit
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#6
in a japanese drama with english subtitles it was translated as:
Thank you for the food...

I guess a literal translation would be: I am going to start (eating)... or ermmm god, its hard isnt it...or.... i am having it!

Thak you for the food i have received???

shiran

lol [Image: laughlong.gif]
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#7
itadakimasu means "i am going to receive"
that's why it can be said before eating or upon receiving a gift

if they subtite it into english, it will usually say something different just because that's how english is and it depends on the context..there's no real equivalent in english
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#8
There isn't an exact translation, so you would need to appropriate it.

Something like:

"I thank you (insert name of your God) for what I am about to receive, for I have sinned, and I really don't deserve to eat the fruits of this universe laid before me. Please forgive me for I am truly sorry for all those I have wronged and will no doubt wrong again tomorrow. I am really really sorry."
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#9
Actually, how about simply "Thank you, food."
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#10
at my school, we had the kids say, "Let's eat!" or "May I eat?"

Along the same theme--how would you translate "おつかれさま! otsukaresama!"
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#11
"Otsukaresama" is "You're tired" in English.

In fact, I used to have a Japanese colleague who used to say this to me. Hilarious.
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#12
<!--quoteo(post=174074:date=Mar 28 2007, 04:33 AM:name=Zashikibuta)-->QUOTE(Zashikibuta @ Mar 28 2007, 04:33 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->There isn't an exact translation, so you would need to appropriate it.

Something like:

"I thank you (insert name of your God) for what I am about to receive, for I have sinned, and I really don't deserve to eat the fruits of this universe laid before me. Please forgive me for I am truly sorry for all those I have wronged and will no doubt wrong again tomorrow. I am really really sorry."<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Japanese is such a concise language. [Image: laughlong.gif]

Best translation for itadakimasu. ever.
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#13
Everyone alwaya said "otsukaresama" to me at the end of the day when I was working in Japan. I miss it. Even though I'm not chittomo tired. Baka.
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#14
Itadakimasu "Well then, I'm munching away now, k?"
Gochisousama "Man, I'm full!"
Otsukaresama "Thank god, that day is over. See you guys tomorrow... again <.< "

Sort of...
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#15
Itadakimasu: supposedly comes from "Inochi wo itadakimasu"...so "I'm taking your life, O leafy green veggie, glossy grains of rice and fried fish, all of which were killed just for my consumption" (i.e. pretty similar to Zashikibuta's translation). But yeah, no proper equivalent in English, so I'd go with Bon Appetit too.
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#16
Really?

Just goes to show that randomly saying things means that at least some of the time, you're gonna get it right.
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#17
^
Actually, there are appear to be a couple of theories on itadakimasu.

The abovementioned Inochi wo itadakimasu theory, and the holding the thing you receive above your head to show respect for it theory. The second one is interesting, because it's all related to the kanji é ‚ , which can mean the top of a mountain...putting the thing you're receiving above your head is supposed to reflect this (!?) and show respect. Or something equally confusing. I have no idea what I'm talking about.

I think the first theory is usually used on kids, while the second is the actual meaning?
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#18
Like business cards?
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#19
I've never received a business card and held it above my head. But that's just me.
I do make it hover at face level, though. Never really thought about the proper height of business card receiving. Ah, a whole new topic.
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#20
Neither. Protocol is weird, like the correct height to wai.
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