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Itadakimasu Translation Challenge
#21
wai? [Image: eh.gif]
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#22
Thai prayer hand thing.
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#23
<!--quoteo(post=174344:date=Mar 28 2007, 08:35 PM:name=chiquita)-->QUOTE(chiquita @ Mar 28 2007, 08:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->I've never received a business card and held it above my head. But that's just me.
I do make it hover at face level, though. Never really thought about the proper height of business card receiving. Ah, a whole new topic.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Actually, in Japan, you're suppose to treat the card as if it's the person themselves, to show respect. So when I get a card, while I don't hold it about my head (if I did that with a card, would mean that I did that to the person, and having to lift everyone I meet professionally over my head would really do my back in), what I do is give the card a seat of its own at the meeting table, and put a glass of water in front of it. That way people know I respect them.
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#24
Oh. This, eh:

[Image: wai.jpg]

There's a whole argument too, as to whether Japanese people should do this wai-like hand thingy (合掌:gasshou = hands together) while saying Itadakimasu...a lot of people do, and some schools (esp. Kindergartens) teach kids to do it, but nobody seems to be 100% sure why they do it, or whether it's necessary.
[color="#9ACD32"]Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

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#25
<!--quoteo(post=174350:date=Mar 28 2007, 03:46 PM:name=Zashikibuta)-->QUOTE(Zashikibuta @ Mar 28 2007, 03:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->what I do is give the card a seat of its own at the meeting table, and put a glass of water in front of it. That way people know I respect them.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Just a measly glass of water? [Image: wtf.gif]
I think doing a tea ceremony in its honor is more respectful, and proper.
[color="#9ACD32"]Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

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#26
Don't be silly, can't be messing around with tea ceremonies when you have important meetings with agendas you have to cover in a limited time.

Water has no status. Therefore it is the safest thing to offer people. Nobody complains about water.
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#27
Speedy tea. Okay, it's not ceremonious, but it's the next best thing. Far better than water, at any rate.
[color="#9ACD32"]Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

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#28
You're supposed to close the business deals during tea ceremonies, preferably with hostesses and companions [Image: smile.gif]
Japanese hockey, Asian sports and whatnot:

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#29
^
SEE?

We mustn't forget, of course, the obligatory Nyotaimori once the deal has been closed...in celebration.
[color="#9ACD32"]Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

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#30
"otsukaresama" = "you're tired" ? [Image: blink.gif] i don't think Z would make a good translator. (although she would make a hilarious one.)

how about "dozo yoroshiku onegaishimasu!"
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#31
<!--quoteo(post=174485:date=Mar 29 2007, 06:39 AM:name=beebs)-->QUOTE(beebs @ Mar 29 2007, 06:39 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->how about "dozo yoroshiku onegaishimasu!"<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

That's "Please, take it!"
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#32
Ok, so how do you say, 「あたしの青春、返して!」(Atashi no seishun kaeshite!) in English?
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#33
^
Ahahahaha. Why? Who d'you want to say it to?

"Give me back my youth/my teen years/my 20s/my virginity/my sanity"...whatever you consider your seishun to be, I suppose.

A friend and I at uni used to say "bon fatigué" (word for word, "good tired"...but we just made it up [Image: biggrin.gif] ) as our own little personal aisatsu for "otsukaresama".
[color="#9ACD32"]Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

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#34
you can use いただきます in a sexual way, very polite.
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#35
<!--quoteo(post=174549:date=Mar 29 2007, 02:50 PM:name=chiquita)-->QUOTE(chiquita @ Mar 29 2007, 02:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->^
Ahahahaha. Why? Who d'you want to say it to?

"Give me back my youth/my teen years/my 20s/my virginity/my sanity"...whatever you consider your seishun to be, I suppose.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I think the most accurate way to say it would be "Give me back my blue spring!"
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#36
<!--quoteo(post=174612:date=Mar 29 2007, 10:29 PM:name=namie wants me)-->QUOTE(namie wants me @ Mar 29 2007, 10:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->you can use いただきます in a sexual way, very polite.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

You can also say 「わぁ〜!おいしそう!」and 「ああ、食った、食った』in a sexual way too.
                      (ああ、くった、くった)
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#37
haha.
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#38
That would be so sexy, ne..."ahhh, kutta kutta" after sex. Must try it some day.
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#39
AHAHAHAHA!!!
I am going to say it to Falco this very afternoon.
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#40
HOw about:

Marietta nantoka nantoka des... douzo yoroshiku onegaitashimasu?!!! [Image: tongue.gif] thats tricky too
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