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Harahetta!
#1
For those of you who speak Japanese, what are the things that slip out in Japanese, or that you just prefer to say in Japanese? (Including Japanese phrases/etc. that don't have English/your language/whatever translations)

For example, I don't think I've ever told my parents that I'm "hungry". It's either, "Dad, harahetta!" or "Mama, onaka suita!"

Or the other day, I said "It's so fucking SAMUI!" and my friend just kinda like stared at me for a while.

Oh, and when people in school irritate me, I sometimes scream "OMAE NA-!" ^^;


You guys?
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#2
Unko and Shikko.
It's true.

We (my siblings and I) ALWAYS say: "Ich gehe jetzt unko machen" "Ich muß shikko machen !"

These two words are the only words that slips out in Japanese ^^

P.S.:

Translation:

1. I have to take a dumb/number 2
2. I have to piss/pee
[color="blue"]Better living with chemistry [/color]

[color="green"]

Just when you thought that unsightly pasta stains had no champion, and you were comfortable in a world where mayonnaise didn't fight back, comes a creature made entirely of the stuff that bursts out of mashed caterpillars. These are the rock stars of downtrodden gravy stains and greasy splotches everywhere: a large, intelligent cube of glop that can chase you down and digest you before you've accepted you're being beaten up by an overachieving dessert.
[/color]



[Image: creature_gelcube.jpg]
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#3
"Suzushii~." Who the hell says "It's so coooooool!" in English? I mean when talking about weather. [Image: eh.gif]

I also keep wanting to respond to things with "Betsu ni."
"Drink wine, and you will sleep well. Sleep, and you will not sin. Avoid sin, and you will be saved. Ergo, drink wine and be saved." -- Medieval German saying
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#4
There are countless things that I utter in Japanese regularly.

When I pick up something heavy or I'm reaching far for something, I'll say "Yoisho".

I sometimes say something like "kore wa omoshiroi [Image: hmmm.gif] " when I'm at home and something good is on TV.

I think in English 99% of the time so I feel very Japanese when I find myself uttering these things. [Image: laugh.gif]

If I remember anything else, I'll add it to this thread. Then you guys can say "souda souda". [Image: wink2.gif]
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#5
"Natsukashii" is one that my bf had to learn quickly, as I use it quite alot and can't find anything close in English or German...
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#6
soune, souda, nanka. 'Nanka' is a word I can't live without. Also 'Anone' and 'chotto'. And of course, 'ah sou?'.
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#7
i say 'kuso' way too often
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#8
<!--quoteo(post=136008:date=Jan 24 2006, 07:00 PM:name=Nez)-->QUOTE(Nez @ Jan 24 2006, 07:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->There are countless things that I utter in Japanese regularly.

When I pick up something heavy or I'm reaching far for something, I'll say "Yoisho".<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I do that too. Although I sound more like an ojisan saying it. "Yooossho." My way of talking sounds like an old guy from time to time anyways, I've been told this week under laughter. [Image: eh.gif] I guess I have to buy this book I saw at the kombini today "女性の美しい話し方"...

Anyways.


Yabai. No real translation possible in my eyes.

I also think words like kimoi, dasai, umai, tsukaretaaaaaaa are better in Japanese.
魂の獄に封じられしモノたちが解き放たれた!
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#9
^

Yuri, I have that book.
It was pretty good and really interesting.
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#10
I too say "yoisho" on occasion, and it's probably the only Japanese utterance I use. Unlike the other expressions which have some sort of non-Japanese translation, there isn't any equivalent in English -- you just don't say anything! Maybe "ugh!"?

Has anyone ever had to explain "yoisho" to someone who doesn't speak Japanese? "It's an utterance you make when you lift or push something..." [Image: wtf.gif]

<!--quoteo(post=136076:date=Jan 24 2006, 04:27 PM:name=Yuriko)-->QUOTE(Yuriko @ Jan 24 2006, 04:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Yabai. No real translation possible in my eyes.

I also think words like kimoi, dasai, umai, tsukaretaaaaaaa are better in Japanese.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Yabai: definitely no English translation. Even more confusing when used to mean "dangerously good/cool"; like this song is so good it's yabai...

I think a good English counterpart for "dasai" is "sucks". They don't mean quite the same, but both have subtle nuances... and both are way overused.
I shall serve no fries before their time.
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#11
mendokusai
itadakimasu
gochisousama
gambatte
If ignorance is bliss then I'd rather be miserable....
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#12
Many untranslatable sounds:

eeeee
un
anoooo
eeeto
"Drink wine, and you will sleep well. Sleep, and you will not sin. Avoid sin, and you will be saved. Ergo, drink wine and be saved." -- Medieval German saying
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#13
Ayashii is another expression I prefer in Japanese.
"Drink wine, and you will sleep well. Sleep, and you will not sin. Avoid sin, and you will be saved. Ergo, drink wine and be saved." -- Medieval German saying
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#14
Iiiii naaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!
魂の獄に封じられしモノたちが解き放たれた!
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#15
maa ma ma ma ma is also a handy one..
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#16
geeee
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
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#17
bukkake [Image: ohmy.gif]
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#18
Souka sembei ----- samui!!!
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#19
@LJ: [Image: laughlong.gif] sabuuuu!
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#20
<!--quoteo(post=136030:date=Jan 24 2006, 12:59 PM:name=swiss miss)-->QUOTE(swiss miss @ Jan 24 2006, 12:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->"Natsukashii" is one that my bf had to learn quickly, as I use it quite alot and can't find anything close in English or German...<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

So-, natsukashii!
And mendokusai - I guess it could translate as, "I can't be bothered" dakedo chotto chigau... [Image: dry.gif]
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