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You don't spell it like that anymore
#1
I heard that コンピューター is now spelled as コンピュータ. Can anyone confirm this?

By the way, how do you do a 小さい「ゆ」? I copied and pasted the word out of JimBreen above.
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#2
both versions are correct.

you just type konpyu-ta for the small yu, for typing computer you don't need to do anything special. Just how kompyu-ta is typed. if you want a small yu without a p, b, ch, etc. in the front, you type "xyu". (xyo, xo, xa, etc.)
魂の獄に封じられしモノたちが解き放たれた!
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#3
People always try to tell me that the romaji for my name should be Yuki (it was officially Yuuki before). I could really care less but the only problem is that unless you know the kanji for it, people pronounce it ゆき instead of ゆうき。
Suffering is above, not below.

And everyone thinks that suffering is below.

And everyone wants to rise.
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#4
Lots of technical people drop the trailing ”ー” because many technical terms are katakana that end in "-er" so they make sentences longer. But you can go either way.
Japanese hockey, Asian sports and whatnot:

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#5
I once got a point deducted from my test score at SOAS for adding the ー in コンピュータ, so there seem to be some kind of rule... [Image: evil.gif]
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#6
<!--quoteo(post=130812:date=Dec 14 2005, 07:55 AM:name=swiss miss)-->QUOTE(swiss miss @ Dec 14 2005, 07:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->I once got a point deducted from my test score at SOAS for adding the ー in コンピュータ, so there seem to be some kind of rule... [Image: evil.gif]<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Sorry to disrupt the flow of the topic but when did you go to SOAS? There were a few SOAS people at the same uni as me in Kyoto as ryugakusei. We all went to Kyoto Gaikokugo Daigaku.
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#7
I was at SOAS 1997-2000, but in 2 different classes, so I had 2 "sets" of class mates at kyoto gaidai. When were you there? That would be funny if we had mutual friends!
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#8
I was there from sept 2002 - sept 2003. I was there with Dimitri a monk and Emma an Italian girl. I'm sure that the people that went to gaidai from SOAS before me did all the same things I did, like go to Tottori and go to Arashiyama on the torroko densha etc. The kokusaikouryu bu at Gaidai were so nice!

So when you studie at SOAS did you do a year abroad in your 2nd year too?
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#9
no, I'm afraid I missed out on that. they wouldn't let me skip the 1st year, then during the 1st they figured my Japanese was too good to send me to Japan, so I took an exam to go to 3rd. I had been looking forward to that year in Japan, but financially, I'm glad they wouldn't let me (would have added an additional year's overseas student fee to my debts).
what I heard, the quality of kyoto gaidai was the highest of all programmes.
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#10
<!--quoteo(post=130921:date=Dec 14 2005, 12:53 PM:name=swiss miss)-->QUOTE(swiss miss @ Dec 14 2005, 12:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->no, I'm afraid I missed out on that. they wouldn't let me skip the 1st year, then during the 1st they figured my Japanese was too good to send me to Japan, so I took an exam to go to 3rd. I had been looking forward to that year in Japan, but financially, I'm glad they wouldn't let me (would have added an additional year's overseas student fee to my debts).
what I heard, the quality of kyoto gaidai was the highest of all programmes.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I think that Gaidai was great because it was a uni specifically for languages, so you had awesome teachers that could cater for higher levels and also the students were really friendly. I think that if i had of gone to a uni like Sophia i wouldn't have met as many people as I did. The uni organised so many trips for us for free and we had an awesome graduation too. Very lucky. When I came back from Kyoto i could read a newspaper and wrote my thesis in Japanese!!! Thank you gaidai.
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#11
sounds great!
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#12
I've seen ピザ spelled ピッツァ and カルボナラ spelled カルボナーラ, so I just chalked it up to foreign words not always having one correct spelling. Am I wrong to expect variations, or are these just rogue Japanese who don't spell well?
"Drink wine, and you will sleep well. Sleep, and you will not sin. Avoid sin, and you will be saved. Ergo, drink wine and be saved." -- Medieval German saying
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#13
<!--quoteo(post=140139:date=Feb 23 2006, 07:08 AM:name=tanpopo)-->QUOTE(tanpopo @ Feb 23 2006, 07:08 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->I've seen ピザ spelled ピッツァ and カルボナラ spelled カルボナーラ, so I just chalked it up to foreign words not always having one correct spelling. Am I wrong to expect variations, or are these just rogue Japanese who don't spell well?<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Seems the increasing use of ピッツァ is due to recognition that ピザ is simply incorrect. Even in the U.S. (which is where pizza came to Japan from), it's "peet-sa", not "pee-za", so ピザ is really a Japanese mispronunciation under the misconception that it should be pronounced as English. Probably over the years enough Japanese got funny looks trying to order "pee-za" in both Italy and the U.S. that they realized maybe something was really wrong with their pronunciation.

I think tha "a" in carbona~ra should be long, whether spoken in English, Japanese, or It-ta~lian.
I shall serve no fries before their time.
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