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Using 'gozaimasu'
#1
hey minnasan

just wondering - when can you use gozaimasu? i know its used in ohayo gozaimasu, but although its the formal version of 'desu' can you say 'Kochira wa Maikeru Jémisan gozaimasu (or de gozaimasu)'.

When do you put 'de' infront of it too? I've heard announcments that finish with '......de gozaimasu'


can anyone help me out? [Image: tongue.gif] domo!
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#2
You usually use de with gozaimasu. I dont think you use it without.

It usually comes after a noun, I think...
I'm only here for this moment



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#3
so it would be 'kochira wa Hazuki-san (eg!) de gozaimasu' or 'kochira wa Supaisu Gerusu de gozaimasu!'

cool thanks
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#4
yeah thats it! well done

its pretty tought explaining things like that but it just makes sense to add "de" infront of gozaimasu.
I'm only here for this moment



Jeff Buckley - Everybody here wants you lyrics
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#5
Arigatou gozaimasu <!--coloro:#FF0000--><!--/coloro-->O<!--colorc-->
<!--/colorc-->
Arigatou de gozaimasu <!--coloro:#FF0000--><!--/coloro-->X<!--colorc-->
<!--/colorc-->
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#6
<!--quoteo(post=116581:date=Oct 1 2005, 10:02 AM:name=Marisuke)-->QUOTE(Marisuke @ Oct 1 2005, 10:02 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Arigatou gozaimasu <!--coloro:#FF0000--><!--/coloro-->O<!--colorc-->
<!--/colorc-->
Arigatou de gozaimasu <!--coloro:#FF0000--><!--/coloro-->X<!--colorc-->
<!--/colorc--><!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

lol yeah there are exceptions...

when would you use gozaimasu? apart from set phrases that is like ohayo....and arigato.....

can you use it when introducing yourself/others etc?

when else can you use it ?
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#7
It's basically the polite form of "desu". You have to use polite language before and afterwards, too, though. It will sound weird if you don't. If you're starting to learn Japanese, better not use it. Stick to masu/desu-form. It's so much depending on the situation whether you should use keigo or not. You will make a fool of yourself if you're overpolite rather than making a good impression.
魂の獄に封じられしモノたちが解き放たれた!
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#8
<!--quoteo(post=116587:date=Oct 2 2005, 06:50 AM:name=Yuriko)-->QUOTE(Yuriko @ Oct 2 2005, 06:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->It's basically the polite form of "desu". You have to use polite language before and afterwards, too, though. It will sound weird if you don't. If you're starting to learn Japanese, better not use it. Stick to masu/desu-form. It's so much depending on the situation whether you should use keigo or not. You will make a fool of yourself if you're overpolite rather than making a good impression.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->


also can be used in place of "arimasu"

kuuseki wa gozaimsu
kuuseki wa gozaimasen
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#9
You'll find it used in honourific speech in the place of desu and arimasu, like others have said.

You'll use it if you work in the services industry and have to be polite to customers (as a waiter, etc). Other than that you really don't hear it used that much, especially not frequently enough in everyday speech for you to be worried about it if you are just starting to learn Japanese.
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#10
de aru/desu = de gozaru
aru = gozaru

So, if I wanted to introduce myself politely, it would be "Tanpopo de gozaimasu." If I wanted to say "There is udon", it would be "Udon ga gozaimasu".

If you want to get into nitty gritty grammar, this is what I was taught as far as the way phrases like "Ohayou gozaimasu" break down:

hayai -> o-hayau -> o-hayou + gozaru
medetai -> o-medetau -> o-medetou + gozaru
etc.
"Drink wine, and you will sleep well. Sleep, and you will not sin. Avoid sin, and you will be saved. Ergo, drink wine and be saved." -- Medieval German saying
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#11
cool - thanks thats really helpful guys [Image: biggrin.gif]
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