Poll: What do you think makes a person a half
Culture
Language
genetics
country of origin
other
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あなたは本当のハーフ?
#1
Its a

contorversial topic so I put it down here,

but 皆さんはどう思いますか?&#260

85;本語と英語、両方できなくて&#124

18;ハーフと言える? ハーフは見&#12

383;目? それでも中身?
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#2
That depends on how you define ハーフ right? ハーフって言葉も it's not the best term to describe ourselves... having said that I'm not sure which label is best for us... In my opinion, my appearnance does not make up who I am (although a lot of people at first sight judge you by your 'look'). For me to be able to say "I am American and Japanese" I need to know and practice (or at least to be able to practice) both cultural elements such as language, religion, arts and literature, history, food, customs, values and norms. But I think culture is also often associated with things like physical appearance, nationality, national origin, shared territory, or common ancestry. I don't believe that one's physical appearance should be associated with a culture. Because culture and biology are two totally separate to me. The notion of ?race? is concerned largely with people?s physical make-up like colour of skin, height, hair colour, body built, etc. And there are assumed behaviours & attitudes associated with various physical types, which implies that thre are different races.

But then again, people do put social meanings to biological elements. And I think this is the problem because at the end of the day it's not our blood that makes a difference, what matters is culture. In Europe 'race' is a taboo word, at least from what I gathered from living here several years. Moreover did you know that 99.9% of genes across different 'races' are the same????

Say there is a social group of "Italian - Japanese ハーフ", then I think you ought to know both cultures and this definitely includes the language. This is because I believe in cultural elemnts and not biology. Ofcourse I bet some will not agree to my view...
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#3
This is not right. This is sooooooooooo not right.

The poll question, for those who cannot read it is, "Can you be called a real Haafu if you don't speak Japanese?"
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#4
Just an observation but why does it have to be 日本語と英語? It can be Italian, French or whatever the other half is no?

Interesting topic, I would like to contribute but I don't have the time at the moment. Will come back later.
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#5
I'm not asking if its right or wrong...just for opinions.....controversial topic...yes!


@yumi

I guess that's the question then. Is being half a genetic thing or is it a cultural thing. The premise behind this whole forum is that being half is a genetic trait.
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#6
<!--quoteo(post=91315:date=Jun 19 2005, 04:36 AM:name=Davide)-->QUOTE(Davide @ Jun 19 2005, 04:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Just an observation but why does it have to be 日本語と英語? It can be Italian, French or whatever the other half is no?

Interesting topic, I would like to contribute but I don't have the time at the moment. Will come back later.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Just an example....but you're right...could be anything
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#7
Why was the poll made in Japanese? [Image: ohmy.gif]
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#8
I made the poll in japanese to get the opinions of the Japanese speakers. It wasn't meant to discriminate against anyone, but to have a more controlled poll.
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#9
<!--quoteo(post=91321:date=Jun 19 2005, 04:55 AM:name=MiraiZ)-->QUOTE(MiraiZ @ Jun 19 2005, 04:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->I made the poll in japanese to get the opinions of the Japanese speakers. It wasn't meant to discriminate against anyone, but to have a more controlled poll.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
or just a very skewed one.
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#10
関係無い、period.

M.. a little bored, trying to stir up controversy? [Image: tongue.gif]
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#11
Ok Let me clarify as to why I made this post. I met 2 people last week. One person was biologically half (mother Japanese; father non-Japanese). She was born and raised in Japan, went to a Japanese public school, and only speaks Japanse. Her parents were divorced when she was very young and barely knows who her father was. We got to talking and she said something to the effect of "ハーフで生まれて羨ましいな" (I envy you because you are half). I responded by saying "君もハーフじゃん!" (You're Japanese too!) to which she responded "No I'm not; not a "real" one". Iwas puzzled but she explained herself. She said that even though she is biologically half, she has no ties to her other half. She doesn't speak the language and she is culturally 100% Japanese. I understood what she was saying but didn't quite agree until I met the other person. I'm sure you all know Michiyo aka Strawberry by now. Well, we had a similar converstation just the other day. In her case, she's almost the opposite. She is biologically 100% Japanese. However, if you talk to her for a while (even in Japanese) you begin to realize she is a bit different. She grew up in different countries and speaks many different languages. Culturally, she isn't quite 100% Japanese. If I had my eyes closed or never had met her in person< I would be convinced that she's half.

This, then made me think what really makes a person half? Looks? Culture? Language? Parents? Hence, I brought up this question.

Edit: For the record, I voted 微妙

(not sure)
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#12
<!--quoteo(post=91333:date=Jun 19 2005, 06:15 AM:name=MiraiZ)-->QUOTE(MiraiZ @ Jun 19 2005, 06:15 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Ok Let me clarify as to why I made this post. I met 2 people last week. One person was biologically half (mother Japanese; father non-Japanese). She was born and raised in Japan, went to a Japanese public school, and only speaks Japanse. Her parents were divorced when she was very young and barely knows who her father was. We got to talking and she said something to the effect of "ハーフで生まれて羨ましいな" (I envy you because you are half). I responded by saying "君もハーフじゃん!" (You're Japanese too!) to which she responded "No I'm not; not a "real" one". Iwas puzzled but she explained herself.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I must say I totally agree with her! I think in America and Japan race matters, more than in Europe. A lot of people believe in races (in the plural sense). Whereas my partner (he's french) regards me as Japanese because I embrace the Japanese culture, despite my white mask (although he does not really know what it is to be Japanese his judgement may be wrong or inaccurate).

Language is not the only cultural element but I must say it is probably the most important one. Language can give us the world (some may disagree to this).

Although being totally bicultural is reallly difficult. I think social class and parental encouragement play a big role here as well. Because the higher your social class background there is a higher chance of being able to move back and forth the two (or even three or four) countries that your parents are from. Thus acquiring a better understanding of the two (or more) culture and thus the societies.

Most of the time I feel that I have more in common with those who have lived in Japan at one point of their lives. Having things in common is an important source of identity as a social group ハーフ (ハーフ in my sense).

I think what matters is NOT one's genetic traits. It doesnt matter what colour of skin you have, how tall/small you are, how narrow your eyes are, etc. Culture does not derive from your genetics. We only BELIEVE it derives from genetics.
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#13
<!--quoteo(post=91321:date=Jun 19 2005, 04:55 AM:name=MiraiZ)-->QUOTE(MiraiZ @ Jun 19 2005, 04:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->I made the poll in japanese to get the opinions of the Japanese speakers. It wasn't meant to discriminate against anyone, but to have a more controlled poll.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Why only of the Japanese speaker? You mean the one's that can speak English AND Japanese and you wanted to hear of them whether they think they are "halvsily superior" to the non japanese speaking halvsies? Sorry, but I think this one's weird, too...
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#14
<!--quoteo(post=91352:date=Jun 19 2005, 07:48 AM:name=Yuriko)-->QUOTE(Yuriko @ Jun 19 2005, 07:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Why only of the Japanese speaker? You mean the one's that can speak English AND Japanese and you wanted to hear of them whether they think they are "halvsily superior" to the non japanese speaking halvsies? Sorry, but I think this one's weird, too...<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
I don't think it's something to do with superiority/inferiority.... I think you got that wrong. It's more to do with being bicultural or not. Being bicultural is definitely not superior to being monocultural.
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#15
No, this is not a superiority thing. I don't think anyone is more or less superior than anyone else and that was not the purpose of this poll. I guess what the real question here is what makes a person half..(I will change the poll to reflect that.)

But anyways, let me throw out some more examples here. I don't look Japanese AT ALL. As a matter of fact, one of my talent agents markets me as a Japaese speaking South East Asian [Image: rolleyes.gif] [Image: laughlong.gif]

And I don't have one of those faces where when I walk outside people know that I am half. I am automatically labelled a gaijin. And if you really want to get technical, I'm not even genetically "half". I am a mix of a lot of different things including Taiwanese, northern European, Afican and Japanese. So my background is pretty complex, but culturally, I only relate to my Japanese and American sides. And personally, for me, the main thing that distiguishes those two sides is language. It may be different for others, so I wanted to know (from those who do speak more than one language) what is it that makes you half?
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#16
But still then it's only adressed to the bicultural members? To basically discuss whether members different then they are (not speaking Japanese) aren't bicultural? Whatever. I usually am not someone talking dead the right or wrong of a topic, so:

Discuss!
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#17
If this poll was set up in a Japanese language haafu board, it might yield a different result. But then again, those Japanese speaking halvsies who don't feel haafu because they only speak Japanese, do get used to the idea that there are all sorts of halvsies (in terms of languages, cultures, appearance, etc.) once they get to meet many halvsies in person. If they grew up surrounded mostly by Japanese people, they might have this weird notion about "real" halvsies being multi-lingual.
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#18
I think a haafu is a haafu whether she/he is bilingual or not, this was the question deshou? I find it very interesting that MiraiZ friend said she wasn't haafu because she doesn't speak her father's language and is monocultural. Maybe many monolingual & monocultural haafus think this way, I don't know because I haven't met many such haafus. I'd like to hear more of what she (and others in her situation) has to say about this.

Personally, I'm very grateful that I have been able to spend so much time in both Finland and Japan and thus manage with both languages. As I've mentioend before, I can't imagine not being able to communicate with relatives in both countries, in their own language. And then, every extra language is a plus.
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#19
<!--quoteo(post=91356:date=Jun 19 2005, 08:00 AM:name=Yuriko)-->QUOTE(Yuriko @ Jun 19 2005, 08:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->But still then it's only adressed to the bicultural members? To basically discuss whether members different then they are (not speaking Japanese) aren't bicultural? Whatever. I usually am not someone talking dead the right or wrong of a topic, so:

Discuss!<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

some of them are...yes...I address the Japanese speakers because I think most non-Japese speaker would answer no (maybe a bad assumption on my part) but I pewrsonally wanted to know what the Japaese speakers thing...does being able to speak Japanese make you half or is it something else?
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#20
<!--QuoteBegin-Mabuta+Jun 20 2005, 01:06 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Mabuta @ Jun 20 2005, 01:06 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> I think a haafu is a haafu whether she/he is bilingual or not, this was the

question deshou?

I find it very interesting that MiraiZ friend said she wasn't haafu because she

doesn't speak her father's language and is monocultural. Maybe many monolingual & monocultural

haafus think this way, I don't know because I haven't met many such haafus. I'd like to hear more of

what she (and others in her situation) has to say about this.

Personally, I'm very grateful that I

have been able to spend so much time in both Finland and Japan and thus manage with both languages. As I've

mentioend before, I can't imagine not being able to communicate with relatives in both countries, in their

own language. And then, every extra language is a plus. <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
There are many like this believe it or not and most of theese people

think its because of the language.


Two well known people: Umemmiya Ana and Miyazawa Rie don't

consider themsleves as half and aren't marketed as half, whereas Becky makes a very heavy appeal that she is

half. What's the difference?
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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