Poll: What do you think makes a person a half
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genetics
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あなたは本当のハーフ?
#21
OK, I

thought about it for a sec now and I think the term ハーフ itself says everything. It's

the description of something that is not complete and I don'T think it will ever be possible for anyone born

between two nationalities to equally fill out both nationalities cultures, languages, etc.

I would like

to meet the person that actually is 100% equally both nationalities.

In my case, I'm naturally more

German than Japanese, cause I grew up in Germany. I also don't speak very good Japanese, but still I call

myself half, even though the cultural elements in my character and life learned in Germany and of course, from

my German mother, outweigh enourmously the Japanese. I wouldn'T want anyone to tell me "No, you're

not!"

I can understand that I cannot be called Japanese because I grew up in Germany, but I

cannot udnerstand why I couldn't be called half because I grew up in Germany.
魂の獄に封じられしモノたちが解き放たれた!
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#22
<!--QuoteBegin-MiraiZ+Jun 20 2005, 01:07 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (MiraiZ @ Jun 20 2005, 01:07 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-Yuriko+Jun 20 2005, 01:00 AM--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Yuriko @ Jun 20

2005, 01:00 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> But still then it's only adressed to the

bicultural members? To basically discuss whether members different then they are (not speaking Japanese)

aren't bicultural?

Whatever. I usually am not someone talking dead the right or wrong of a topic,

so:

Discuss! [/quote]
some of

them are...yes...I address the Japanese speakers because I think most non-Japese speaker would answer no (maybe

a bad assumption on my part) but I pewrsonally wanted to know what the Japaese speakers thing...does being able

to speak Japanese make you half or is it something else? <!--QuoteEnd--> </td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
Perhaps in a forum where Japanese is the main language. But since

English is the language here, Japanese speakers here also speak English and have heavy doses of Anglo culture,

so it's not really the target demographic you were looking for..
Japanese hockey, Asian sports and whatnot:

[url="http://jhockey.wordpress.com/"]http://jhockey.wordpress.com/[/url]
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#23
<!--QuoteBegin-MiraiZ+Jun 20 2005, 01:07 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (MiraiZ @ Jun 20 2005, 01:07 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-Yuriko+Jun 20 2005, 01:00 AM--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Yuriko @ Jun 20

2005, 01:00 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> But still then it's only adressed to the

bicultural members? To basically discuss whether members different then they are (not speaking Japanese)

aren't bicultural?

Whatever. I usually am not someone talking dead the right or wrong of a topic,

so:

Discuss! [/quote]
some of

them are...yes...I address the Japanese speakers because I think most non-Japese speaker would answer no (maybe

a bad assumption on my part) but I pewrsonally wanted to know what the Japaese speakers thing...does being able

to speak Japanese make you half or is it something else? <!--QuoteEnd--> </td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
but if it's based on your experience with the girl you talked

about, and you are adressing other japanese speakers, you should focus on "does being able to speak another

able besides japanese make you half" cause she said that's what it's about, right? And it

doesn't make sense to ask Japanese speakers whether being able to speak Japanese makes you half, cause that

girl spoke Japanese.

but this is pointless. I see you changed the poll, so I'm gonna read through it

and vote now.
魂の獄に封じられしモノたちが解き放たれた!
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#24
<!--QuoteBegin-Yuriko+Jun 20 2005, 01:19 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Yuriko @ Jun 20 2005, 01:19 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-MiraiZ+Jun 20 2005, 01:07 AM--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (MiraiZ @ Jun 20

2005, 01:07 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-Yuriko+Jun 20 2005, 01:00

AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3'

cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Yuriko @ Jun 20 2005, 01:00 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> But still then it's only adressed to the bicultural members? To basically

discuss whether members different then they are (not speaking Japanese) aren't bicultural?

Whatever.

I usually am not someone talking dead the right or wrong of a topic, so:

Discuss!

[/quote]
some of them are...yes...I address

the Japanese speakers because I think most non-Japese speaker would answer no (maybe a bad assumption on my

part) but I pewrsonally wanted to know what the Japaese speakers thing...does being able to speak Japanese make

you half or is it something else? <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
but if it's based on your experience with the girl you talked about,

and you are adressing other japanese speakers, you should focus on "does being able to speak another able

besides japanese make you half" cause she said that's what it's about, right? And it doesn't

make sense to ask Japanese speakers whether being able to speak Japanese makes you half, cause that girl spoke

Japanese.

but this is pointless. I see you changed the poll, so I'm gonna read through it and vote

now. [/quote]
Yes...I suppose went about it

the wrong way. I did change the poll question a bit. And of course this wasn't meant to segragate, or

alienate anyone. I apologize if that's the way it appeared. I just wanted to do a poll on a control group

and not the whole forum. But I do get the idea now.

I think the answer is that there are many factors

based on the individual that makes a half. Although I consider myself a half, I have met people with near

identical backgrounds who don't...so maybe it is subjective to the indvidual and how they preceive

themselves?
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#25
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 19 2005, 07:09 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 19 2005, 07:09 PM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-Mabuta+Jun 19 2005, 04:06 PM--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Mabuta @ Jun 19

2005, 04:06 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> I think a haafu is a haafu whether she/he is

bilingual or not, this was the question deshou? <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
But that's only in terms of genetic traits.. I am half Japanese and

half American because my mother's Japanese and my mom's America. So I am a "haafu". BUT I am

not both American and Japanese. Although I would not call myself as Japanese because I went to an international

school for several years during my childhood, I would call myself Japanese rather than Japanese and American.

Does that make sense??? [/quote]
This

thread just shows that everyone has got their own definition of who's haafu and who's not.

Is a

person whose one parent is 5th generation American Japanese and the other one 2nd generation.. say Dutch, a

haafu? Some say no, because there is not much left of what's Japanese.

[Image: happy.gif] This is really a thread of controversy.
like no other
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#26
yeah,

it totallly depends on how you define "haafu". I don't particularly like the word

"haafu" but to me this term refers to bicultural persons - embracing two cultures (including the

language). I used to think that the nationality/ethnicity of my parents is what moulds me but I recenlty

realised that culture is the key to who I am. Ofcourse I am still regarded as a foreigner in Japan but

心は日本人です. (Having said that I think I sometimes don't act

like a typical 'Japanese'... but what is a typical Japanese anyway?)

EDIT: There are different

types of genetic haafus. I feel that I belong to a group of certain types of haafu... does anybody feel that

way? Maybe this is not directly related to the topic.
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#27
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 20 2005, 01:09 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 20 2005, 01:09 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> I am half Japanese and half American because my mother's Japanese and my

mom's America. So I am a "haafu". <!--QuoteEnd--> </td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'>

<!--QuoteEEnd-->
Hihi... sorry... [Image: laugh.gif] I just saw and had to giggle.
魂の獄に封じられしモノたちが解き放たれた!
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#28
well, it

depends on what you're talking about. it makes no sense to say that you're "half" if you have

two cultures. "half" implies that you're only 50% of something, so this makes sense when you

apply it to genetics.

you're "half" if one of your parents are a different race/ethnicity

than your other parent. in this case, "half" Japanese.

i wouldn't see someone as

"half" that had two Japanese parents and one was from the US and the other from Japan. clearly,

there'd be two different cultures brought into the picture for a child.. but that doesn't by any means

make them "half" in my view.

i don't see myself as really bicultured, because my mother

isn't very cultured to Japanese culture. she doesn't speak Japanese, she doesn't have a lot of

Japanese cultural traditions, and she's never even been to Japan. i hardly count my exposure to small

tidbits in Japanese culture as being "cultured" in Japanese culture in any way. for those people who

do have a parent from Japan and have a lot of influence with both their native culture (be in European,

American, Australian, etc) and Japanese culture.. i'd see those people as being multi-/bi-cultural.

definitely not "half". they don't have "half" a culture either way. they have multiple

ones.

same with language. there are a lot of people that can speak multiple languages. i'm not sure

how anyone could define these people as "half" just because they speak multiple languages.

i

guess my response to someone that was actually half non-Japanese and half Japanese that felt that they

weren't "really half" because they were only single cultured is to explain that the

"half" experience isn't strictly based on culture. if that were the case, then i guess i'm

not half either. i'm White American [Image: crazy.gif] . the multi-/bi-cultural experience isn't limited to people that are

half. the "unique" thing about being half comes through having the exposure to two different raced

parents and often times the ambiguity that the appearance of ther offspring often have and experience daily with

in society. this is also why i don't think a half Asian and half-Japanese can be seen as hapa/haafu either

because there's a huge proponent there missing. they may have similar experiences and may have something in

common that shares a Japanese parent with Japanese culture influenced within the family.. but the

individual's experience in society is clearly going to be different.
Reply
#29
<!--QuoteBegin-kristina+Jun 20 2005, 01:55 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (kristina @ Jun 20 2005, 01:55 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> well, it depends on what you're talking about. it makes no sense to say

that you're "half" if you have two cultures. "half" implies that you're only 50% of

something, so this makes sense when you apply it to genetics.

you're "half" if one of your

parents are a different race/ethnicity than your other parent. in this case, "half"

Japanese.

i wouldn't see someone as "half" that had two Japanese parents and one was from

the US and the other from Japan. clearly, there'd be two different cultures brought into the picture for a

child.. but that doesn't by any means make them "half" in my view.

i don't see myself

as really bicultured, because my mother isn't very cultured to Japanese culture. she doesn't speak

Japanese, she doesn't have a lot of Japanese cultural traditions, and she's never even been to Japan. i

hardly count my exposure to small tidbits in Japanese culture as being "cultured" in Japanese culture

in any way. for those people who do have a parent from Japan and have a lot of influence with both their native

culture (be in European, American, Australian, etc) and Japanese culture.. i'd see those people as being

multi-/bi-cultural. definitely not "half". they don't have "half" a culture either

way. they have multiple ones.

same with language. there are a lot of people that can speak multiple

languages. i'm not sure how anyone could define these people as "half" just because they speak

multiple languages.

i guess my response to someone that was actually half non-Japanese and half Japanese

that felt that they weren't "really half" because they were only single cultured is to explain

that the "half" experience isn't strictly based on culture. if that were the case, then i guess

i'm not half either. i'm White American [Image: crazy.gif] . the multi-/bi-cultural experience isn't limited to people that are

half. the "unique" thing about being half comes through having the exposure to two different raced

parents and often times the ambiguity that the appearance of ther offspring often have and experience daily with

in society. this is also why i don't think a half Asian and half-Japanese can be seen as hapa/haafu either

because there's a huge proponent there missing. they may have similar experiences and may have something in

common that shares a Japanese parent with Japanese culture influenced within the family.. but the

individual's experience in society is clearly going to be different. <!--QuoteEnd--> </td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
good point...its interesting how different people identify

themselves...I guess this is all decided during that weird and akward identity crisis phase.
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#30
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 19 2005, 09:38 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 19 2005, 09:38 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> EDIT: There are different types of genetic haafus. I feel that I belong to a

group of certain types of haafu... does anybody feel that way? Maybe this is not directly related to the topic.

[/quote]
since you base your haafu

experience specifically on culture, then you would feel like you belong to someone that has a Japanese mother

(or father) and a European father (or mother).

someone that's black/Japanese is going to have a very

different experience than someone that's white/Japanese. same way someone with a mother that's Japanese

would have quite a different experience than someone that has a Japanese father. the parents' influences

are very different to children.

i definitely think it's culture that really defines us, not our

ethnic background. but i don't see someone as "haafu" by the mere definition of what we're

calling it (i.e. "half") because of culture. someone can be haafu and be monocultural (most likely to

the culture of the country they reside in). i don't think that someone with a single culture is "less

haafu" than someone else that has the influence of two cultures from their family.

i've always

said that i'm American before i'm half Japanese and half White. for me, my American influence with

respect to my culture and who i am today has defined me much further than my ethnic/racial heritage.
Reply
#31
<!--QuoteBegin-Yuriko+Jun 19 2005, 04:50 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Yuriko @ Jun 19 2005, 04:50 PM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 20 2005, 01:09 AM--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 20

2005, 01:09 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> I am half Japanese and half American because my

mother's Japanese and my mom's America. So I am a "haafu".

[/quote]
Hihi... sorry...

[Image: laugh.gif] I just saw and had to giggle. <!--QuoteEnd-->

</td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
hehe... [Image: laugh.gif]
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
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#32
<!--QuoteBegin-kristina+Jun 20 2005, 02:00 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (kristina @ Jun 20 2005, 02:00 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 19 2005, 09:38 AM--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 19

2005, 09:38 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> EDIT: There are different types of genetic

haafus. I feel that I belong to a group of certain types of haafu... does anybody feel that way? Maybe this is

not directly related to the topic. <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
since you base your haafu experience specifically on culture, then you

would feel like you belong to someone that has a Japanese mother (or father) and a European father (or

mother).

someone that's black/Japanese is going to have a very different experience than someone

that's white/Japanese. same way someone with a mother that's Japanese would have quite a different

experience than someone that has a Japanese father. the parents' influences are very different to

children.

i definitely think it's culture that really defines us, not our ethnic background. but i

don't see someone as "haafu" by the mere definition of what we're calling it (i.e.

"half") because of culture. someone can be haafu and be monocultural (most likely to the culture of

the country they reside in). i don't think that someone with a single culture is "less haafu"

than someone else that has the influence of two cultures from their family.

i've always said that

i'm American before i'm half Japanese and half White. for me, my American influence with respect to my

culture and who i am today has defined me much further than my ethnic/racial heritage. <!--QuoteEnd-->

</td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
Yes...I can totally realate this

statement...enthically I am part African American, and it is the most dominant trait visually. But culturally,

I am definately not African American. But it did take me several years to find who and what I am.
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
Reply
#33
to me

there are haafus out there who are "genetic & cultural haafus" and "genetic haafus".

Maybe "cultural haafus" can exist as well.
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#34
Very

controversial topic...
Well, I usually call myself 100% ハーフ (strange definition, or

not?).
I was lucky to go to Japan very often in my childhood. What was terrible to me (I mean leaving my

school friends during summer holidays and staying 3 monthes in a country where I didn't speak at all its

language) became a lucky thing.

Is speaking 日本語 important for an halvsie? Mmh, yes,

now I would say yes.
I explain: when I was a child I had a sort of refusal of japanese language and culture,

but when I finally started by my own decision to study 日本語, at 20 (now I'm 31), I

slowly came to accept "the other part" of me, recognizing how wonderful it was.
I must say that

Japan and Italy are on opposite sides as regard culture and way of living, and so I understood that to live in

peace with myself I had to go deep in both the cultures, even language.

Even now is very hard, but I try

to take the best of both cultures.
Of course this is only my opinion based on my personal experience.


[Image: happy.gif]
Reply
#35
It's so interesting to know what people think about this topic.

Like Fuji said, I think language

is very important because this is probably the only tool I can use to communicate with Japanese people and to be

accepted by the society in general (although as we know we can sometimes still be regarded as foreigners because

of our foreign look). I cannot call myself half Japanese if I do not know the culture <b>and</b> language. (And

as I have been repeatedly saying, this is why I do not regard myself as half American. )

I still think

calling ourselves <b>half this half that</b> is inappropriate though....
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
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#36
<!--QuoteBegin-saki-girl+Jun 20 2005, 09:25 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (saki-girl @ Jun 20 2005, 09:25

AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->
<!--QuoteBegin--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->I still think calling ourselves half this half that is inappropriate though....

[/quote]

But why should one exlude half

of their nationality, their roots? Even if it's only a half, isn't that part of our identity? Of course

many other factors shape a person's identity, but genetically, our being is made up of what our parents are.

If one grows up in a completely different country (X) then he/she is entitled to say 'I am from X', but

that doesn't mean one shouldn't say 'I'm half...' if that is what one is.

[/quote]
Yeah, I see what you mean there.

But biology and culture are two separate things. Your biology is a fixed thing that is given to you at birth but

culture is something that grows and changes constantly which is not neccessarily a direct result of the biology.

I agree that we ought to know our roots but this does not actually mould our culture, who we are. Maybe I'm

the only one who thinks that way but I really don't believe in genetics at all. We're all human beings

and that's the end of story for me. To me, what matters is culture.

I didn't mean that one should

not say I am half this I am half that. I occassionally say I'm half American half Japanese. This isn't a

problem I think. But social identity and biology are two different things. So I always add "I've never

lived in the US and despite my nationality, I am not American. I feel more Japanese"

Having said

that, I've got to admit it is always interesting to know who your ancesters are. It is family history, but

knowing my roots does not actually influence my identity. I don't know if this is making sense but I think

my biology has nothing to do with my culture. It 'appears' like there is a link between my ancestors and

culture but this is because of the way in which I was brought up.

I have a Tunisian friend who was born

in Paris and raised among French kids and never lived in Tunisia. He is French. He is not Tunisian but French in

心 (heart), as we say in Japanese. He has a Tunisian 'blood' but he is not Tunisian in culture.

His Tunisian-ness (in terms biology) does not influence his social identity (except for the fact that other

people treat him as Tunisian). A person with a Tunisian mask can be French.

So let's say there is a

Russian/Japanese who was brought up in Russia and embraces only the Russian culture. Then she is a Russian

person to me, although her genetics can be attributed as a mixture of Russian and Japanese.

I still think

that genetics does not influence your culture and who you are. Maybe I've got a very unique way of looking

at people (including myself).
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#37
^

I totally and utterly agree with Yumi.
Being half is definetly not just about genetics.
Reply
#38
^

Yumi,do you feel a little British too?
Reply
#39
<!--QuoteBegin-Marisuke+Jun 20 2005, 02:21 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Marisuke @ Jun 20 2005, 02:21 PM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> ^

Yumi, do you feel a little British too? <!--QuoteEnd-->

</td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
Not at the moment ... but maybe in a few

years! I do speak with a slight British accent though!
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#40
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 20 2005, 01:37 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 20 2005, 01:37 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> I cannot call myself half Japanese if I do not know the culture <b>and</b>

language. [/quote]
it's a totally

different issue though.

when someone says they're Japanese, it's not necessarily talking about

culturally or language. when i hear someone tell me that they're Japanese, i'm thinking immediately

they're talking about their genetic heritage.

by your standards, my mother can't call herself

Japanese. she doesn't know the culture or the language. so please, tell me.. what is she and how she she

identify herself since she's not "really" Japanese? also, by what you're saying.. someone

that's completely non-genetically Japanese could tell people they're Japanese simply by knowing the

culture and the language.


<!--QuoteBegin--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->(And

as I have been repeatedly saying, this is why I do not regard myself as half American.

)[/quote]

well, first of all..

there's no such thing as "half American". American is a nationality, not an ethnic group or a

racial group.

you're either American or you're not.


<!--QuoteBegin--></div><table

border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b>

</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->I still think calling ourselves <b>half this half that</b> is

inappropriate though....[/quote]

how is

it inappropriate?

we're talking about genetics. it's the same way you talk about mixed breed

dogs. that dog is mixed half pug and half beagle. it's the same concept.

my mother is full

Japanese, my father is full Caucasian.

thus, i'm half Japanese and half Caucasian. i don't see

how that's "inappropriate".
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