Poll: What do you think makes a person a half
Culture
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genetics
country of origin
other
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#41
<!--QuoteBegin--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3'

cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->

when someone

says they're Japanese, it's not necessarily talking about culturally or language. when i hear someone

tell me that they're Japanese, i'm thinking immediately they're talking about their genetic

heritage.[/quote]

I think this depends

on your personal belief and experience. As I have been repeatedly saying in several of my posts... I don't

believe in biology giving us the world. I consider culture as giving us the world.

But if you think

it's race that gives you the identity of being a haafu, then that's that. I don't have any problems

with that. We all have different points of views.

<!--QuoteBegin--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->when i hear someone tell me that they're Japanese, i'm thinking

immediately they're talking about their genetic heritage.<!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><!--QuoteEEnd-->

But I don't. Simple as that... if you think genetic heritage is

what you conjure up when you hear words like Japanese, Chinese, French etc. then that's how you think.

It's interesting to know how people have different understanding of a given

word/event.

<!--QuoteBegin--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3'

cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->

well, first of

all.. there's no such thing as "half American". American is a nationality, not an ethnic group or

a racial group.

you're either American or you're not.<!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><!--QuoteEEnd-->

oh really? Maybe I don't quite understand this bit ..




<!--QuoteBegin--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3'

cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->
how is it

inappropriate?[/quote]

I'm not a

chocolate bar where 50% is milk and 50% is cacao. I'm a <i>being</i> with mainly Japanese culture and some

foreign influence. That's why when I refer to myself as "half American (50%) and half Japanese

(50%)", this has a racial connotation. In fact anything to do with race, biology or genetics I personally

dislike them... I am not forcing my opinion to others.

But hey we all have different views. It's only

natural. Please don't be upset just because I have different veiws...
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#42
Hmmm...really interesting topic. Isn't the main thing here not 'what makes you haafu' but simply

which cultural sockets are you plugged into? I think if I hadn't been packed off to Japanese school, sent

back to Japan regularly and only spoken to in Japanese by my mother I think that my Japanese side wouldn't

mean much more to me than an opening gambit at a cocktail party.

Sometimes I get the feeling that being

Japanese is a bit like being part of a religion. How well integrated are you? How well do you speak? Ah, but you

can never really be a true believer because you weren't born into it etc etc.
Reply
#43
I was

just thinking ... is everybody clear about the term 'half' in the Japanese sense? Sorry if you all know

it but in case not... here goes the lesson:

In Japan, there have been several terms to refer to mixed

persons: konketsuji, ainoko, kokusaiji, hafu, daburu (roughly in chronologial

order).


<b>Ainoko</b>
During and after WWII, 'Ainoko' was used to described the

mixed-blooded people which literally means a “child of mixture” and is considered derogatory and evoking images

of poverty, illegitimacy, racial impurity, prejudice and discrimination

<b>Konketsuji</b>
As the

American occupation came to an end, the word Ainoko was gradually replaced by the term 'Konketsuji' –

like 'Ainoko' meaning literally the “mixed-blood child” which still included negative

connotations.

<b>Kokusaiji</b>
The label 'Kokusaiji' was advanced by the International Year of

Child in 1979. It means “international child” which emphasises the international heritage as positive. It

supposedly did not have a negative connotation.

<b>Haafu</b>
'Haafu' comes from the English

word “half” and it means "half Japanese and half foreigner". This term became widespread in the 1970s.

It was an attempt to attach a trendy label (particularly to those who are considered phenotypically White.

While, konketsuji and ainoko entail associations with the military and single mothers (they are rarely used

nowadays), 'haafu' signifies a bright image of a fashionable, foreign-looking Japanese who speaks fluent

English so it includes the stereotype of intelligence.

@ Miraiz, Maybe this explains why the girl you met

doesn't regard herself as haafu. I think number9 sort of mentioned this.


<b>Daburu</b>
This is

a fairly new term which derives from the English word "double". It was developed to correct the

deficiencies of “haafu” and to emphasise that multiethnic persons “are not “half” anything, but have the

ethnicity of both parents. But I think this word has been rarely used by halvsies due to its overemphasis of

positive self-assertion and many feel that “haafu” is acceptable.
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#44
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 20 2005, 09:59 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 20 2005, 09:59 PM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->...
<b>Daburu</b>
...I think this word has been rarely used by halvsies due

to its overemphasis of positive self-assertion<!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
You forgot
<b>Quadupuru</b>
Me [Image: tongue.gif]
I'm always overephasizing my positive and negative

self-assertion...
Joking, just to throw a little bit of water on the gasoline [Image: wink2.gif]

I repeat that basing on my own experience, when I started to study

japanese language and japanese culture I really felt better.
In my classroom people always pointed to me

saying "you are (half) japanese, you should know this and that", etc. (think that italians are not so

open minded and familiar with other cultures, expecially in the past years...)
That doesn't mean that

before I wasn't happy, but for sure now I understand better myself even when I'm not so italian.

Sometimes I get angry in a japanese way, and you not what? it's me [Image: biggrin.gif]
Well, maybe I was a little bit pushed to know better my japanese side by

the questions that other people asked me, but now I'm really feeling fine [Image: biggrin.gif]
Reply
#45
I put

down genetics, and let me tell you why ...

Miraiz, I'm pretty much just like the person you met

except in reverse -- Japanese mom, white dad, but raised more or less totally in the white culture with just a

few touches of Japanese culture thrown in every now and then. Whenever someone flat-out asks me what my

ethnicity is, I used to answer, "My mother is from Japan." I say that because I couldn't say

honestly that I was Japanese. My mom, she's Japanese. I am, for all intents and purposes really, a

culturally white girl who has a great affection and interest in all things Japanese, a culturally white girl

with a personal connection to Japan. But I meet lots of other people who have the same kind of interest and

affection for all things Japanese who are of any Japanese ethnicity. In fact, a lot of these folks know more

about Japan than I do and actually speak Japanese! But they're not haafu, and they can't be, no

matter how much they embrace the culture or learn the language or whatever. But here I am -- fairly pig ignorant

about my mom's culture and just NOW, so late, starting to find out about it -- but I'm haafu and not

just a white girl American because of my mom. AND my dad.

There's a flip side to this, of course. I

live in Oklahoma, where there are lots of Native American tribes. Each tribe has a different standard for

membership, but the Cherokee Nation's standard is this -- if you can prove that one of your ancestors were

Cherokee, you can be a member. Doesn't matter if by now you're about 1/64th Cherokee or less, if you can

prove it, you're in. Many of these "card-carrying" tribal members have no real connection with the

tribe or its heritage or its language or anything, but they can be members just the same. I know too many people

who joined up just for the health and social service benefits. So they're "genetically" Cherokee

and are "officially" Cherokee, but they have nothing to do with the things culture and heritage. And

yet they're still Cherokee.

So what's the difference? Well, I love my mom to pieces, I want to

honor my dad, so I choose to be both than just be one or the other. I think it's most honest when you've

got all the factors working for you -- genetics, culture, language, etc. But really it's a matter of how you

see yourself. I know for sure that my mom thinks of herself now as an American rather than an Japanese person.

Lord, she's starting to watch NASCAR, and I don't know how much more American you can be after you start

doing that!
"Soccer is crystal meth. It's very addictive, but really messes up your teeth. I guess I've never viewed soccer as some sort of controlled substance. To me, it's probably more like Nutella. The rest of the world clearly loves it and puts it on almost everything, but here in America we're like, "I don't know, man, it tastes like almonds." -- Jon Stewart
Reply
#46
Most halfu peeps with Japanese moms USUALLY speak in Japanese so I'm used to speaking to other halfu kids

in something we call "halfu-go", a mix of english and Japanese which I'm sure y'all familiar

with. However, I've come to realize that not everyone does and I think thats okay.

I dont think

you're NOT a proper halfu (whatever that means)just coz you cant speak Japanese! I can't speak

Arabic but I dont think I'm less of an Arab. Well, thats just me. but yeah, I would say that I feel more

Japanese coz I speak the language so that makes me feel more comfortable about who I am.

I feel lucky

that I can speak my mother's language because even though my english is probably better than my Japanese, I

feel more comfortable speaking in Japanese because I consider it my "own language". I wish I could

speak Arabic but atleast I can sort of understand the others around me so I'm not completely hopeless!
I'm only here for this moment



Jeff Buckley - Everybody here wants you lyrics
Reply
#47
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 20 2005, 08:24 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 20 2005, 08:24 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->

when someone says they're Japanese, it's not necessarily talking

about culturally or language. when i hear someone tell me that they're Japanese, i'm thinking

immediately they're talking about their genetic heritage.<!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I think this depends on your personal belief and experience. As I

have been repeatedly saying in several of my posts... I don't believe in biology giving us the world. I

consider culture as giving us the world.

But if you think it's race that gives you the identity of

being a haafu, then that's that. I don't have any problems with that. We all have different points of

views.

<!--QuoteBegin--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3'

cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->when i hear someone tell

me that they're Japanese, i'm thinking immediately they're talking about their genetic

heritage.[/quote]

But I don't.

Simple as that... if you think genetic heritage is what you conjure up when you hear words like Japanese,

Chinese, French etc. then that's how you think. It's interesting to know how people have different

understanding of a given word/event.

<!--QuoteBegin--></div><table border='0' align='center'

width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->

well, first of all.. there's no such thing as "half

American". American is a nationality, not an ethnic group or a racial group.

you're either

American or you're not.[/quote]

oh

really? Maybe I don't quite understand this bit ..


<!--QuoteBegin--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> </td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->
how is it inappropriate?<!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I'm not a chocolate bar where 50% is milk and 50% is cacao.

I'm a <i>being</i> with mainly Japanese culture and some foreign influence. That's why when I refer to

myself as "half American (50%) and half Japanese (50%)", this has a racial connotation. In fact

anything to do with race, biology or genetics I personally dislike them... I am not forcing my opinion to

others.

But hey we all have different views. It's only natural. Please don't be upset just

because I have different veiws... <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
first of all, i apologize if i came off harshly. not my intention. i

guess the problem i have with your stance on the issue is that i feel that your definition of "haafu"

limits people. basically, it's a definition that says.. you're not <i>really</i> haafu/hapa/half

Japanese if you don't know the culture and the language. i don't see how that's a fair view of

somebody and by the things you've said, it's been the constant issue i've seen time and time again.

i'm not "japanese enough" to be able to identify with asian/japanese/being hapa or

haafu.

there are two things that exist here: culture and ethnicity.

i agree with you that the

culture of someone has a much greater impact in who they are. it's the reason why i've always said

i'm American before i'm half japanese and half white. my growing up in America and being raised by

American parents has had a lot more to do with who i am today than my mother being japanese and my father being

white.

however, obviously my ethnic identity has some bearing on my life. despite not being very

japanese in culture, my appearance has accounted for much in my life. how society views me, how society sees

me, how i'm often treated/seen by others, etc. it's also affected me in the sense of my family, the

foods i eat, the desire there to want to know more. it's still a part of who i am because it's a part

of who my mother is, her mother and father, etc, etc.

there's really two kinds of being

"japanese" in my view. you can be ethnically japanese and you can be japanese by culture. to be

japanese by culture, you don't even have to be japanese by genetics. in regards to "American"..

American isn't an ethnic group. it's a nationality, the same way being born in japan makes you japanese

by citizenship/nationality. being "white" doesn't make you American. my japanese mother is as

American as my white father who are as American as i am. the reason why i said you can't be "half

American" is because it makes no sense in the literal terminology of "half". i don't see how

someone can be half American. you're either born in the US, making you an American citizen.. or you

retrieve US citizenship.

there are haafus around the world that are all "half Japanese"

regardless of what their culture is and what language they speak. it's uniquely what binds us together.

it's our native culture, the culture to whatever land and whatever practices our own families have that make

us unique. someone with a full Japanese parent and someone with a full non-Japanese parent will always be half

Japanese/hapa/haafu. no one can change that and language and culture doesn't somehow affect their identity

in being half Japanese. it's those differences that simply make us individually unique.

more so

than claiming <i>half this and half that</i> being inappropriate.. i think it's more inappropriate to tell

someone that they're not something they clearly identify with. they don't know enough to be considered

a part of the group? life is already complicated as it is in this ethnic/race-based world where society tries

to group us by these differences.. than to be told you're not "really" something you identify

with. my response to your difference in opinion is a bit personal and defensive because my opinion doesn't

tell you how to identify yourself. it doesn't exclude you from anything. yours is personal to me because

it's a form of dictating what i can and cannot identify as, something i don't think anyone should be

doing for anyone in the first place.
Reply
#48
@

Kristina, well said. Interesting point of view.

If I have offended some of you, I'm very sorry. But I

prefer to see people (if I had to) ethnically (-cultural elements) and not racially (-biological elements).The

world still view people in terms of race... which is a sad thing I think. I think my defition is the first step

to a race-free society. But then again, maybe my definition gives rise to cultural discrimination?? Please

everybody, I do not intend to exclude people.

I have my own personal opinion and this might change at

times. You never know! I like to play with the idea/definition. But at the moment I feel that culture is

what defines anybody (including haafus). We need to keep in mind that the term "haafu" arose within

the Japanese discourse. In Britain or American we can't say "I'm half" - right?

BTW

I'm an American citizen (and this is the only nationality I have...)
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#49
Yeah and I

think we have a lot in common as well, as havlsies (in the genetic sense)

An ambiguous status in the

world
Non-acceptance by your own people
Stereotype of being knowledgable about the countries your parents

are from

etc etc

Okay I think my post is straying from the main topic.
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#50
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 21 2005, 11:36 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 21 2005, 11:36 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->

Non-acceptance by your own people


<!--QuoteEnd-->

</td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
soooo true!I don't feel accepted by

haafu's cause I don't know a lot of them!those I know don't like me cause they think I'm too

japanese in all kind of ways!but what's the fuss about???call label yourself whatever you want,in the

end you will be human and people who don't think of you as human isn't worth your time.
Zoovy
Reply
#51
<!--QuoteBegin-Yugen a.k.a. Willy+Jun 21 2005, 11:19 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center'

width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Yugen a.k.a. Willy @ Jun 21 2005, 11:19

AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 21 2005, 11:36 AM--></div><table

border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi

@ Jun 21 2005, 11:36 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->

Non-acceptance by your

own people


[/quote]
soooo

true!I don't feel accepted by haafu's cause I don't know a lot of them! <!--QuoteEnd-->

</td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
I actually meant own people = people of the two

(or more) countries where your parents are from. It can be interpreted in your way as well though.

Interesting! I often say I'm a "nise" haafu (fake haafu).

Yeah labels are not good....

as soon as you label someone (or something), you need to clarify the defition and that's all too much of a

trouble ne. We are who we are tte okotode!
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#52
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 21 2005, 10:36 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 21 2005, 10:36 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> Yeah and I think we have a lot in common as well, as havlsies (in the genetic

sense)

An ambiguous status in the world
Non-acceptance by your own people
Stereotype of being

knowledgable about the countries your parents are from

etc etc

Okay I think my post is straying

from the main topic. [/quote]
Don't

forget naval-gazing!
Reply
#53
<!--QuoteBegin-Hanako+Jun 21 2005, 11:31 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Hanako @ Jun 21 2005, 11:31 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 21 2005, 10:36 AM--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 21

2005, 10:36 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> Yeah and I think we have a lot in common as

well, as havlsies (in the genetic sense)

An ambiguous status in the world
Non-acceptance by your own

people
Stereotype of being knowledgable about the countries your parents are from

etc etc

Okay

I think my post is straying from the main topic. <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Don't forget naval-gazing! <!--QuoteEnd-->

</td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
and boob-poking! [Image: laugh.gif]
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
Reply
#54
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 21 2005, 11:36 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 21 2005, 11:36 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->....I think we have a lot in common as well, as havlsies (in the genetic sense)



An ambiguous status in the world
Non-acceptance by your own people
Stereotype of being

knowledgable about the countries your parents are from
<!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
I agree. In total.
Reply
#55
<!--QuoteBegin-yumi+Jun 21 2005, 06:36 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (yumi @ Jun 21 2005, 06:36 PM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->Yeah and I think we have a lot in common as well, as havlsies (in the genetic

sense)

An ambiguous status in the world
Non-acceptance by your own people
Stereotype of being

knowledgable about the countries your parents are from

etc etc

Okay I think my post is straying

from the main topic.[/quote]
It’s weird but

I can say fearlessly that I’m Japanese in front of non-Japanese people but when there’s any Japanese person,

consciously or unconsciously I hesitate to say that.
I know I’m not fully accepted by Japanese people

(friends, colleagues etc). Just because of that, it doesn’t mean I can be accepted by Spanish or Brazilian

people. I fall right in between and this ambiguous status is a product of multicultural exposure. There were

times when I wished I had a foreign look instead just like any others or tried hard to become “more” Japanese or

as Japanese as they are in Japan but only very recently I realized that I could just be myself. I’m still trying

to catch up with Japanese patterns of behavior and working in Kyoto where people are more conservative is

actually a good practice. There are also occasions where my gaijin way works… this helps me to achieve the

credibility I need at work without enhancing my professional image. So there are both strong and weak points of

being multicultural, more exactly in my case, being Japanese externally and gaijin internally. In all cases, as

long as I live in Japan and work with Japanese people, I think that it would make my life easier if I could fit

my internal side to my external side just because of what I look like. So I guess I just need to keep trying....

帰国の人でも、すっごい日本人

な人もいるから。どうして私は

こうなったんだろうと思うとき

がある。人によるのかなぁ。
- Ouço a frase: "Ai, acho feio mulher musculosa!". Respondo na hora: "E eu sou perfeita musculosa."

-¿Sabes que soy capaz de mucho más que tú pienses?
Reply
#56
[Image: shutup.gif] Now I'm feeling guilty for asking whether

you are Japanese cause you don't look like half..... You obviously get enough of stuff like that already

right now... But I SWEAR I didn't know!!! [Image: cry.gif]
魂の獄に封じられしモノたちが解き放たれた!
Reply
#57
<!--QuoteBegin-Yuriko+Jun 25 2005, 02:33 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Yuriko @ Jun 25 2005, 02:33 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->[Image: shutup.gif] Now I'm feeling guilty for asking whether you are Japanese cause you

don't look like half..... You obviously get enough of stuff like that already right now... But I SWEAR I

didn't know!!!  [Image: cry.gif][/quote]
No

prob, Yuriko. I wasn't offended at all. My best Brazilian friend (she's 100% caucasian) still asks me if

I'm REALLY Japanese...we've know each other for a long time... She doesn't believe it yet and says I

could be from Costa Rica or Venezuela.... what the hell! I guess I'm giving her a hard time to set aside

that conventional image of a Japanese.
- Ouço a frase: "Ai, acho feio mulher musculosa!". Respondo na hora: "E eu sou perfeita musculosa."

-¿Sabes que soy capaz de mucho más que tú pienses?
Reply
#58
Being

multicultural on the inside and Japanese looking or foreign looking on the outside both come with their unique

problems and stereotypes. Provincial folks just aren't capable of understanding our complexities

(multicultural superiority complex? Makes things go smoother in life [Image: tongue.gif] )
Japanese hockey, Asian sports and whatnot:

[url="http://jhockey.wordpress.com/"]http://jhockey.wordpress.com/[/url]
Reply
#59
<!--QuoteBegin-number9+Jun 24 2005, 11:38 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (number9 @ Jun 24 2005, 11:38 PM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> Being multicultural on the inside and Japanese looking or foreign looking on the

outside both come with their unique problems and stereotypes. Provincial folks just aren't capable of

understanding our complexities (multicultural superiority complex? Makes things go smoother in life

[Image: tongue.gif] ) <!--QuoteEnd--> </td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
i agree.

my biggest "struggle" throughout my life has

been how asian i look in appearance and how non-asian in culture and tradition i am. it's been the center

of much unacceptance and prejudice in my life.
Reply
#60
<!--QuoteBegin-kristina+Jun 25 2005, 08:00 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (kristina @ Jun 25 2005, 08:00

AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-number9+Jun 24 2005, 11:38 PM--></div><table

border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (number9

@ Jun 24 2005, 11:38 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> Being multicultural on the inside

and Japanese looking or foreign looking on the outside both come with their unique problems and stereotypes.

Provincial folks just aren't capable of understanding our complexities (multicultural superiority complex?

Makes things go smoother in life [Image: tongue.gif] ) <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

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i agree.

my biggest "struggle" throughout my life has

been how asian i look in appearance and how non-asian in culture and tradition i am. it's been the center

of much unacceptance and prejudice in my life. <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

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I can say that I've had the exact opposite experience. I look

non-Japanese but I am actually Japanese in culture. I can say that my appearance is a sort of a stigma in Japan

because of the way the society (including people) views me.

PS: Just because many societies are based on

racialist ideas, that does not change my stance as a culturalist.
pineapple and peanut butter rock!
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