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Small Japanese Words
#1
Now

what's difference between:

Chopiri
Chotto
Kondake..
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#2
<!--QuoteBegin-greenhorn+Apr 13 2005, 12:02 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (greenhorn @ Apr 13 2005, 12:02

PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> Now what's difference

between:

Chopiri
Chotto
Kondake.. <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Well doesn't "chotto" mean "a little"...for the

other two words I have no idea...I found these links online....haven't looked at them yet though...so I

don't know if they will help you greenhorn....sorry. [Image: blink.gif]

<a href="http://www.tacto.jp/idol/clone%20your%20memories.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://www.tacto.jp/idol/clone%20your%20memories.htm" target="_blank">http://www.tacto.jp/idol/clone%20your%20memories.htm</a></a>
<a

href='http://jchat.cyber.sccs.chukyo-u.ac.jp/JCHAT/clan/akidata/AKI38.cha'

target='_blank'>http://jchat.cyber.sccs.chukyo-u.ac.jp/J.../AKI38.cha</a>
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#3
<!--QuoteBegin-greenhorn+Apr 14 2005, 05:02 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (greenhorn @ Apr 14 2005, 05:02 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> Now what's difference between:

Chopiri
Chotto
Kondake..

[/quote]
choppiri and chotto have a

similar meaning, but chotto is used more commonly.
kondake means "only/just this

much".

there's also sukoshi, which also means "a little".
Make every moment count!
Reply
#4
<!--QuoteBegin-danielyuki+Apr 13 2005, 04:46 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (danielyuki @ Apr 13 2005, 04:46

PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-greenhorn+Apr 14 2005, 05:02

AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3'

cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (greenhorn @ Apr 14 2005, 05:02 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> Now what's difference between:

Chopiri
Chotto
Kondake..

[/quote]
choppiri and chotto have a similar

meaning, but chotto is used more commonly.
kondake means "only/just this much".

there's

also sukoshi, which also means "a little". <!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Interesting....you know the word "kondake" sounds similar to

the Korean word "Kondaku" (I think that's how you spell it I mean translated to English

letters..not 100% sure though...it means "cleaning rag/cloth"....something like (For example: you

would use to clean your kitchen counter/table,etc.) [Image: smile.gif]


I've heard the word "sukoshi" before.

[Image: smile.gif]
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#5
<!--QuoteBegin-SWC+Apr 14 2005, 09:56 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (SWC @ Apr 14 2005, 09:56 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> Interesting....you know the word "kondake" sounds similar to the

Korean word "Kondaku" (I think that's how you spell it I mean translated to English letters..not

100% sure though...it means "cleaning rag/cloth"....something like (For example: you would use to

clean your kitchen counter/table,etc.) [Image: smile.gif]
<!--QuoteEnd--> </td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'>

<!--QuoteEEnd-->
that would be "zoukin" in Japanese huh? [Image: smile.gif]
Make every moment count!
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#6
Sukoshi is

most formal.
Japanese hockey, Asian sports and whatnot:

[url="http://jhockey.wordpress.com/"]http://jhockey.wordpress.com/[/url]
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#7
<!--QuoteBegin-SWC+Apr 14 2005, 09:56 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (SWC @ Apr 14 2005, 09:56 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->Interesting....you know the word "kondake" sounds similar to the Korean

word "Kondaku" (I think that's how you spell it I mean translated to English letters..not 100%

sure though...it means "cleaning rag/cloth"....something like (For example: you would use to clean

your kitchen counter/table,etc.) [Image: smile.gif]
<!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
The "n" in "kondake" is a contraction of

"re", koredake -> kondake. Similarly, "sorenara" -> "sonnara".



It's very informal and used only in speech, never in writing.
I shall serve no fries before their time.
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#8
<!--QuoteBegin-Riktov+Apr 13 2005, 06:56 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Riktov @ Apr 13 2005, 06:56 PM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> <!--QuoteBegin-SWC+Apr 14 2005, 09:56 AM--></div><table border='0'

align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (SWC @ Apr 14 2005,

09:56 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin-->Interesting....you know the word "kondake"

sounds similar to the Korean word "Kondaku" (I think that's how you spell it I mean translated to

English letters..not 100% sure though...it means "cleaning rag/cloth"....something like (For example:

you would use to clean your kitchen counter/table,etc.) [Image: smile.gif]
<!--QuoteEnd--></td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'><!--QuoteEEnd-->
The "n" in "kondake" is a contraction of

"re", koredake -> kondake. Similarly, "sorenara" -> "sonnara".



It's very informal and used only in speech, never in writing. <!--QuoteEnd--> </td></tr></table><div

class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
[Image: blink.gif] Oh thanks for the explanation/info. Riktov...that's the reason why I was

having so much trouble trying to find any information (the definition) about the word "kondake".

[Image: smile.gif]
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#9
My gf

told me kondake is slightly rude...
ie If I went into a restaurant and looked at the size of the meal and

said "KONDAKE"... I'd get a slap (metaphorically speaking) for being a rude gaijin.
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#10
I

know and use chotto, sukoshi and kondake (which I feel is different from the other two) but have never heard or

used the term, chopiri? [Image: eh.gif]
Thus, the task is not so much to see

what no one has yet seen,

but to think what nobody has yet thought

about that which everybody sees



Schopenhauer
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#11
ちょっぴり
ちょっぴりだけ
it

sounds cuter than the other ways of saying

it.
今度使ってみてください

[Image: smile.gif]
Make every moment count!
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#12
is there a

difference between chotto and chokotto?
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#13
<!--QuoteBegin-Davide+Apr 15 2005, 12:22 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Davide @ Apr 15 2005, 12:22 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> is there a difference between chotto and chokotto? <!--QuoteEnd-->

</td></tr></table><div class='postcolor'> <!--QuoteEEnd-->
chokotto sounds like you'd use it more for

liquids [Image: eh.gif]
Make every moment count!
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#14
Don't forget Pucchimoni's (Morning Musume offshoot) "Chokotto Love." [Image: laugh.gif]
"Drink wine, and you will sleep well. Sleep, and you will not sin. Avoid sin, and you will be saved. Ergo, drink wine and be saved." -- Medieval German saying
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#15
<!--QuoteBegin-Lisa Tatsuko+Apr 14 2005, 05:39 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (Lisa Tatsuko @ Apr 14 2005, 05:39 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> I know and use chotto, sukoshi and kondake (which I feel is different from the

other two) but have never heard or used the term, chopiri? [Image: eh.gif] [/quote]


The term/word "chopiri" sounds a lot like "chopi"...isn't that the word for

"salty"in Japanese?.....I'm not sure if it's spelled that way in English though.

[Image: blink.gif]
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#16
that

would be shoppai, which I think is the Kansai way of saying suppai.
Make every moment count!
Reply
#17
<!--QuoteBegin-danielyuki+Apr 14 2005, 09:33 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%'

cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><b>QUOTE</b> (danielyuki @ Apr 14 2005, 09:33 AM)</td></tr><tr><td

id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteEBegin--> that would be shoppai, which I think is the Kansai way of saying suppai.

[/quote]
[Image: blink.gif] thank you daniel! [Image: smile.gif]

I'm always confused about this...okay if the word for salty is

suppai and/or shoppai...what is the Japanese word/English letter spelling for "sweet" and also for

"sour"?
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#18
Sumimasen

ka, I want to know if there is a nihongo word for VEGAN desu.
Does anyone know? Also, if Ahimsa translates?


And, particularly if Soka Gakkai are vegan in Japan?


In Thailand, Vegan is in some dictionaries

and sounds similar... but it needs to be explained with creativity... thus Siri came up with Paaku... which is

something like a forest ranger... so then it evolved to Night Paaku...

I'm allergic to shellfish and

seafood exponentially and am also trying to find ways to describe how I eat... aside from Peta's "Got

Beer?" campaign... (kinda sicka liquid bread....)

Ippon Beeru kudasai...

Much Peace,


Oko_ne ne, ne ne neh neh!!!
[color="#dddd00"][center][size="1"][/size] [/center][center][size="1"]"for Zen's belief in Sudden illumination, a fleeting glimpse of existence just as it really is."[/size][/center][/color]
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#19
Hello

Oko_ne! [Image: happy.gif]


Please check out these

links.....

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target='_blank'>http://www.vegietokyo.com/info4vegie/art...icle2.html</a>
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