Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Are most halvsies individualists?
#21
<!--quoteo(post=210848:date=Aug 25 2008, 03:26 AM:name=gh3tt0nikkei)-->QUOTE(gh3tt0nikkei @ Aug 25 2008, 03:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Or just accept that your white.

im still curious dorknob, do you claim to have japanese blood? Or whats the deal with you, what is your exact relation to japan and being japanese?<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
This is pretty much what I'm talking about, bro.
Reply
#22
<!--quoteo(post=210761:date=Aug 22 2008, 04:00 AM:name=hapacheese)-->QUOTE(hapacheese @ Aug 22 2008, 04:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->In Japan, it's looks first, then language. I believe that I'm fairly well accepted in Japan because of my speaking ability, like you said, but there is still a barrier, particularly with people who don't know you or hardly do. I'd never be mistaken for being native Japanese by anyone living in Japan.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

[img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/yes2.gif[/img] Totally agree.

As for the orignal question...

<!--quoteo(post=210750:date=Aug 22 2008, 01:03 AM:name=gh3tt0nikkei)-->QUOTE(gh3tt0nikkei @ Aug 22 2008, 01:03 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Do you think most halvsies don't feel obligated enough to have ethnic pride for either of their ethnic sides?
Is it a natural position for them to take that individualistic path because they feel different and because of the hanbun complex? ( the ones with the complex are the ones who can't speak japanese fluenlty and perfectly, i imagine, no offense!)<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I actually <i>do</i> have a (fairly bad) complex despite the Japanese fluency (of not looking "Japanese enough" even though I feel more Japanese inside than probably anything else). It's gotten better over the years due to my realization/gradual acceptance of the fact that I'll never really feel 100% comfortable (being inconspicuous enough so as not to get curious stares even when doing the most banal (sp?) things) in Japan due to my "foreign" looks...but I suspect this has more to do with my personality than anything. I know quite a few haafus in Japan (many tend to be in their teens and twenties) who say that their non-Japanese physical appearance doesn't bug them at all, or at least not nearly as much as it seems to bug me. Maybe this means that the Japan they grew up in was less harsh in its judgment of "different-looking" people, or maybe it just means they're more confident personality-wise. More likely the latter, methinks.

As for the ethnic pride thing - some of us live/have lived in cultures outside of both our parents' (myself included) and personally speaking, it made it much harder for me to feel "ethnic pride" for either Japan/Switzerland (in my case) because it wasn't as easy to relate to them (I only visited Japan once during my teens, and my Swiss German sucks, so it was hard to feel like I fit in there).

Might sound weird, but because I spent a large chunk of my childhood in the UK, the national anthem that stirs up the closest thing to national pride that I have is "God Save the Queen." I actually don't even know the Swiss national anthem (but then, neither does my dad [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laughlong.gif[/img] ).

Anyway, in conclusion: I'd say it all depends on the individual, their upbringing etc.
[color="#9ACD32"]Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

[/color]
Reply
#23
<!--quoteo(post=210848:date=Aug 25 2008, 08:26 AM:name=gh3tt0nikkei)-->QUOTE(gh3tt0nikkei @ Aug 25 2008, 08:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Yamapikko didn't write that, moron. Don't misquote people.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Since when has insulting people become acceptable here?
I find you extremely rude, and not only in this thread.

<!--quoteo(post=210848:date=Aug 25 2008, 08:26 AM:name=gh3tt0nikkei)-->QUOTE(gh3tt0nikkei @ Aug 25 2008, 08:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Or just accept that your white.
im still curious dorknob, do you claim to have japanese blood? Or whats the deal with you, what is your exact relation to japan and being japanese?<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I agree with doorknobdiety, all you are doing with your talk is trying to establish some sort of heirarchy where those who are MORE japanese are better than those who aren't. Seems like you feel this sense of superiority towards other halvies that perhaps are less "Japanese" (in your opinion) simply because they don't know the Japanese language as well as you or don't know Japan or haven't been there as much as you.

Why is this "japaneseness" so important to you?
Is your other half just as important to you?
Reply
#24
[agree with doorknobdiety, all you are doing with your talk is trying to establish some sort of heirarchy where those who are MORE japanese are better than those who aren't. Seems like you feel this sense of superiority towards other halvies that perhaps are less "Japanese" (in your opinion) simply because they don't know the Japanese language as well as you or don't know Japan or haven't been there as much as you.]

I never said that those who are more japanese are better than those who aren't. Show me where i said that??? Knowing how to speak the language, knowing japan, and having been there a lot just makes me more culturally and ethnically aware than those who haven't. if it makes me superior than so be it. It's not a bad thing the way you make it out to be. Not my fault that some halfs don't bother learning japanese just because they aren't born and raised in japan and then get offended when a halvsie who does speak japanese calls them out.

btw i take it you don't speak japanese?





[Why is this "japaneseness" so important to you?]

You need to understand something, there are halvsies who have been really influenced by their japanese heritage since they were born and they are proud of it and look past that they are "half". they speak japanese, they listen to japanese music, they have japanese friends, they have family in japan, and some even look japanese and therefore lean toward their japanese side. You can't blame them for emphasizing the value of their japaneseness.

it is ethnic pride.



And from now on im a fullsie. Full japanese-full american OH YEA

FULLSIE PRIDE.
Reply
#25

I speak Japanese. I listen to Japanese music. I have Japanese friends. I have family in Japan.
But I do not feel like any of this makes me any more Japanese than other halvises who cannot say the same of all these things. And why should they?

Do you feel superior in your Japaneseness because you feel inferior in your American side?


How old are you anyway? You seem to get worked up about stuff way too easily.




Reply
#26
[How old are you anyway? You seem to get worked up about stuff way too easily.]

Right and you're oversensitive about the word moron. someone get some tissues.
I just turned 58 btw yeah im getting old wrinkly and fat.

[Do you feel superior in your Japaneseness because you feel inferior in your American side?]

Whoa big question!
if you had any comprehension skills you'll noticed i said full japanese FULL AMERICAN "oh yeah" "Fullsie pride", doesn't that give you any idea?
To answer your question, i feel superior in both but i lean more toward my japanese side just because i've been more influenced by it since i was a kid and till now, is there a problem with that? Or you going to again be deluded and accuse/question me of feeling inferior by my american side because of it? I don't think menina understands the whole definition of being influenced. But back to the main point, i wouldn't use the word superior to describe it, i'd say im fully proud of both. Superior just sounds too conceited and arrogant, and that's not me. definitely not me.
And learn to comprehend. i don't wanna have tell you the answer when you could have easily have seen it by reading my post carefully.

it's apparent to me menina i think you suffer from a superiority/inferiority complex, just the way you present your arguments, assumptions and questions. the fact that i didn't even mention or imply the word or meaning of superior or inferior relating to halvsies who are more or less japanese in anyway in any of my posts just leads me to believe something is up with you. i think you have a problem with people who have ethnic pride. Why is that?

[I speak Japanese]

The real question is if your fluent. Which i don't think you are.
Reply
#27
note: one need not come right out and say the words "superior" or "inferior" to express the same demeaning ideas towards another.

either way, i'm still of the suspicion that gh3tto = chicochacowhat'shername = nwm [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/rolleyes.gif[/img]


[color="#FF8C00"]..,:;"{/'-*~human rights~*-'\}";:,..[/color]

[color="#000080"]I am a citizen of the world[/color]



[color="#008080"]We can not plead against inhuman tyrannies if we don't know what it is to be human. - Robin Fox, anthropologist

[/color]

[color="#00FF00"][url="http://www.racefortibet.org"]Race For Tibet[/url][/color]



YOU ARE SAYING IMPUDENCE TO ME! THAT IS IMPUDENCE!
Reply
#28
not 100% about the meaning of the word individualist but...

Well although I do not feel different or better or worse than my Greek friends, I do find myself often isolated (by my choice) from them, in different ways...

e.g. often I do not participate in conversations and I just listen to them, I do not share same interest etc....

but maybe it just has to do with my character than the fact that I am a haafu [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/unsure.gif[/img]

I am the kind of person that enjoyed a long plane flight cause I can have a whole 11 hours for myself... [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blush21.gif[/img]





Reply
#29
gh3tt0nikkei : [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/rofl.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/rofl.gif[/img]
Reply
#30
this topic has gone awkward.
Reply
#31
this topic has gone lol
Reply
#32
<!--quoteo(post=210942:date=Aug 28 2008, 03:14 AM:name=maeku 476)-->QUOTE(maeku 476 @ Aug 28 2008, 03:14 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->I am the kind of person that enjoyed a long plane flight cause I can have a whole 11 hours for myself... [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blush21.gif[/img]<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
I like the long planeflight too. It means I can eat a Chocolate Chip cookie they give me, pass out from the sugar, and not miss to much!
[color="#dddd00"][center][size="1"][/size] [/center][center][size="1"]"for Zen's belief in Sudden illumination, a fleeting glimpse of existence just as it really is."[/size][/center][/color]
Reply
#33
Hmm...

I think if halvsies who are exposed to japanese culture, are more inclined to have pride regarding their roots. I think it might also depend on if it a halvsie is noticably Japanese...if they arent-it would be easy to forget that they are Japanese in the first place(esp. if they are raised totally in the Western culture).

For me personally, Ive been struggling with identity problems ever since I entered university because I have too much down-time to think about crap. Since I dont look at all Asian and dont carry around with me the social stigmas associated with being a minority, I always identified as being caucasian. But since I started college, ive been seeing myself as a 'halvsie' more. Only those who have seen my mom, would know im "something else," other than white...but that still doesnt erase the 'halvsie' and 'I dont fit in anywhere' feelings.

Since, I had never been exposed to Asian culture because my one Asian grandparent who was a Chinese-Filipino mestizo(I guess that makes me an imposter to this forum in more ways than one...lol), died when I was only 6 or so, I was never really immersed in any of my Asian heritage. My mother is a halvsie more or less who was raised like any assimilated American household would.

I think of I got to know my grandfather and his culture better, I wouldnt have these identity and self-hate problems that Ive been having...I wouldnt feel ashamed of myself for being a quarter asian. I guess lots of ethnically mixed people in America deal with this sort of dilemma in their life; I just hope someday I can feel as proud of being Asian as much as I am of being British and Greek...maybe this forum will help with that.

Reply
#34
Well I would hope so, because I sure I am. I feel attached to both of my cultures and kind of blend them together. Personally if I didn't I'd feel fake and not really myself, but that's just me.
It can vary from person to person.
Reply
#35
<!--quoteo(post=211068:date=Sep 5 2008, 03:17 AM:name=Lancaster86)-->QUOTE(Lancaster86 @ Sep 5 2008, 03:17 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->I think of I got to know my grandfather and his culture better, I wouldnt have these identity and self-hate problems that Ive been having...I wouldnt feel ashamed of myself for being a quarter asian. I guess lots of ethnically mixed people in America deal with this sort of dilemma in their life; I just hope someday I can feel as proud of being Asian as much as I am of being British and Greek...maybe this forum will help with that.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

oh.... well feeling ashamed for yourself and having identity issues is two different things.. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/sad.gif[/img] I still have identity issues , being 32, but I am not feeling ashamed... a bit confused maybe..or the feeling that u dont really fit in anywhere.. but not ashamed...

I dont look Japanese at all btw.. I look more Greek than Japan, anyways... but I have been exposed to Japanese culture a lot so I do feel equally Japanese and Greek...

When I say to people I am half, their response is :

1. (if I say first that I dont look Japanese): oh!! u DO look SOOOO Japanese! its so obvious
2. (if I say that I do look Japanese): oh.. but you DONT look Japanese AT ALL!

[img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/dry.gif[/img]

recently I have blonde higligjhts.. just to make things even more confusin!! [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif[/img]

Reply
#36
Many Japanese Americans went through 4 years of internment camps during WW2 and speaking Japanese was a definite NOT DO

this is why many JA's do not speak the language


<!--quoteo(post=210760:date=Aug 21 2008, 02:41 PM:name=gh3tt0nikkei)-->QUOTE(gh3tt0nikkei @ Aug 21 2008, 02:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->people who are halvsies shouldn't see them selves as "half and half" but as "full and full" it doesn't make sense statistically but just think about it. that way of logic clears out that barrier in your mind that most halfs have of "just a half nothing more nothing less"

I actually think it's in the best interest that all halvsies who want to connect with japanese on a ethnic level go out and learn Japanese fluently, most Japanese won't even see you as just a person who is half japanese anymore once they know your capable of speaking Japanese perfectly. They'll see you as one of them.

I know some Japanese-Americans Nikkei's ( both japanese parents) who can't speak Japanese at all, and they would go to japan and get discriminated and feel rejected because they can't speak Japanese. If they were able to speak Japanese in the first place, discrimination and rejection wouldn't have happen. I know i was there with them, i actually did all the translating for them.

Language(s) = your identity more so than looks.

Someone tell me i'm wrong.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
hokubeinews.com/en/columns/Tomi-Talk
Reply
#37
sometimes... I feel alone... having lots of friends but feeling alone in the sense that there is sth issing...its strange... but anyway... not in a bad way...
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)