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#81
^I guess I'm an old-timer who still likes the old school games too. Maybe I'll give FF13 a try (though I prefer my RPGs on handheld so I can play anywhere. I put so many hours into RPGs that sitting that long in front of the TV makes my butt big).

And I'm really enjoying Megaman10. Easy mode is WAY too easy, and although normal can be challenging, it's a much easier game than Megaman9. Now THAT game made me cuss.
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#82
/begin jaded RPG post... <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Big Grin' />



My problem with monolithic RPGs like most JRPGs is that after playing for a couple of hours, I find myself asking, "Why am I playing this?"



I don't mind character-grinding style games when done right (Borderlands, Diablo, etc). But I simply don't have the time or patience anymore to try to figure out esoteric character advancement systems. If the complexity actually added something that a simple system couldn't achieve, I'd understand. But I have yet to see a JRPG that allowed for customization beyond what a simpler system (like D&D or and of Blizzard's games) couldn't achieve.



Also, maybe I'm too jaded to be blown away by the story in most JRPGs. It's 90% pseudo-philosophical nonsense and heavy-handed symbolism, all set against the same backdrop as just about every other RPG. There *are* a few that break the mold (Eternal Sonata, Yakuza, etc), but they are few and far between. Couple that with the fact that as a player, I have no influence whatsoever on the actual narrative, nevermind the story, and I find myself wondering why I'm playing rather than watching a movie with a better story.



With more interactive narratives, even a weaker story is bolstered by the fact that I have a personal investment in the journey, if not the actual outcome itself. Where those games aren't heavy-handed, I can inject my own imagination to fill the gaps. Since the game isn't holding me by the hand every inch of the way, I can imagine various motivations for the characters or simply do what compels me. In most JRPGs, it's the writers themselves that make all the decisions that matter, and I'm just there to wade through the hordes of enemies and to transport the characters from point A to point B.



That being said, I will probably still play FF13 because I'd be remiss not to <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Tongue' /> FF games always set a benchmark of some sort (graphical, cultural, etc), so I should at least give it a try.



/rant off <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Big Grin' />
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#83
Heh heh...I guess I don't really pay much attention to story...and when I play, I 'become the character' as opposed to the 'character becoming me'. I think it's because I can never make up my mind when I'm confronted with choices. I can sit for hours on end (yes, both figuratively AND literally) mindlessly grinding to get experience points! But I also do enjoy the more interactive games as well. Heavy Rain is definitely on my 'to buy' list!



Oh! And congratulations on Uncharted2 receiving so many awards! Great job Hapacheese! Uh...don't forget! You owe us a song!
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#84
Haha, that's been put on hold for a while until we're more settled into our new place. The guitars have sat packed away in a closet for the last couple of months <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/sad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Sad' />



As for RPGs, I think that either way (you becoming the character or the character becoming you) should allow for choice. OR at the very least, have more solidly written characters that don't alienate the player. It's all in the context.



For example, speaking of Uncharted 2, you never have any choice as Nathan Drake. But you don't care for the most part - he behaves in entirely believable ways. Whereas Tidus in FFX, for example, is a complete nitwit. SPOILER WARNING! Within the first few hours of the game, I had guessed that Yuna was likely going to die from her "Final Summon" (why else would they name it THE FINAL SUMMON?), but it wasn't until like 4-5 hours later that Tidus figured it out on his own. And rather than deal with it like a normal human being, he has an over emotional, scenery-chewing reaction. The writers cannot expect me to "become" Tidus (i.e. the hero) if he is not behaving in a heroic manner or, at the very least, acting in a way that doesn't put him on the emotional level of a 12 year old.



There is a lot of flak given to FF12 for its plodding story (and admittedly, I never ended up finishing it), but I actually was pleasantly surprised. The characters were much more mature and believable. A character actually *gasp!* apologizes for something he did to another character, and the other character actually accepts his apology. They didn't drag out the drama over the next 10 hours of gameplay only to have them resolve their issues in combat and/or a rhythm-based mini-game, which would ultimately result in them becoming best friends and possibly even come to the realization that they are actually long lost brothers from another reality. They talked it out and the story moved on. Well done <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Smile' />
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#85
Isn't Tidus like 17 years old?



So their main character is a whiny child in a game designed for whiny children who will appreciate the whiny childish storytelling and stupid banal philosophy.



Am I getting this right?
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#86
Ahahaha!!! Yes well...emotionally I'm around 12 myself! Anyway, I'm still not done with FF4!!! I've a long way to go...!



And Drake is awesome. <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink2.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Wink' />
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#87
I sincerely believe that I would have wasted significantly less time with Final Fantasy than I did had I only been exposed to Steinbeck a little bit earlier. Any time spent thinking that the death of Aeris was the most sublimely tragic scene in all of human artistic history ever was TIME WASTED.
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#88
I'm still trying to get over Lennie's death...<img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/sad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Sad' />
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#89
Especially considering it wasn't the first RPG to use that tactic (Phantasy Star 2 did it about 8 years earlier).



You have a point in that Tidus is young and shouldn't exactly have the emotional response of an adult, but even then, I don't know any teens that would thrash around while screaming "noooooooo!" in the way he did. (There's also the scene where he teaches Yuna to laugh... dear god, that was excruciating to sit through.)



I'm sure there is some decent stuff at the core of the story in games like FFX, FF7, FF Tactics, Xenogears, etc. Developers need to learn that it does your story no favors when you bury it in 35 extra layers of symbolism and tidbits of philosophy that they learned about in high school.



As for the earlier Final Fantasies, absolutely nothing wrong with them. Their only goal was to provide a fun fantasy-based story to give players an excuse to go around hacking up monsters with giant swords. It's popcorn-movie style entertainment. The big issue comes when writers think they're writing an opus and try to make it sound deep simply by making it nonsensical (I'm looking at you, Hideo Kojima). It may work on the young and naive crowd, but considering that the biggest demography for gamers is early to mid-20s, they need to stop with that.
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#90
Oooh...not a fan of MGS, are you. Heh...I've only played a tiny bit of MGS4. I've got to admit...too much CG. I think that's one of the things I liked best about Uncharted2. The game was so smooth that you always felt like a part of the game.



Thanks for your professional insight Hapacheese!
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#91
Haha, I stopped playing the MGS series after 2. That was probably one of the first games that ever made me *angry*. I had people all around me saying how awesome the game was and how it would blow my mind... the graphics, sure. But my god, that story was horrible. Just remembering it makes me shiver... <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laughlong.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':laugh2:' />
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#92
I respect what Kojima was trying to do with MGS, but goddammit you can't simultaneously make a shooty narrative about a military badass with Stoic Warrior Honor and a postmodern manifesto on tyranny, information, and the horrors of war (as expressed through a shooty narrative about a spec ops badass).



I think what gets me about it is the way he (among many other things) simultaneously tries to impress upon the audience that war is hell (e.g. those four bosses in MGS4 who are all incredibly fucked up with PTSD) and that war is awesome and should totally appeal to teenage boys (e.g. [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8V_zL9Top4&feature=response_watch"]this[/url]). The result is a really stupid message about war--that it's really really bad, except when we do it, and that just perpetuates the pseudo-reluctant-pacifist hero narratives that stretch back from Iraq to Genghis Khan and onwards into prehistory. From what I've seen MGS comes closer than most other violent media to admitting that yes, fighting is awful and that it is bad to frame things in such a way that your protagonist is a good guy in every possible way and also a tremendous badass whose martial skills draw awe from the audience, but Kojima still doesn't have the balls to go all the way.
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#93
Well, that's one layer of the problem. Again, for me, the issue comes about in the fact that he obscures his message(s) in layers and layers of insanity. MGS2 seemed like a never-ending tennis match of "No! You were all a pawn in *my* plans!" comments by the various bad guys. And then they top it off with a nice big dose of "it was all just a dream" (well, not really, but for all intents and purposes it was).
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#94
Downloaded NobiNobiBoy, but can't seem to get him to eat things.



Downloaded Katamari trial, then forgot that I had the actual game, I ordered another from Amazon. Now I have to ship it back to them. How tired was I?



Still a long way to go in FF13. Winter is for skiing, and working two jobs is just too time consuming. Wanna read books too. (Actually, tumblr's been too addictive <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Tongue' /> )



Oh, the TV recorder Torne is out and getting good reviews. Just can't imagine which terrestrial broadcast JTV shows I'd want to record on a regular basis.
Japanese hockey, Asian sports and whatnot:

[url="http://jhockey.wordpress.com/"]http://jhockey.wordpress.com/[/url]
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#95
^Two jobs?! Wow. I hope you get time to rest! Heh...I don't work at all, but lately I find I don't have much time to play either.



Get NobyNobyBoy to eat the small things first, then stretch...poop the stuff out...stretch...eat more... I like to stretch him over the edge (head one way and tail the other) and just let him hang. He stretches quite a bit that way. I haven't played that game in awhile. Your post reminded me about it so I think I'll play again to see what planet we've reached!



Now I'm playing Megaman10 and Braid. I'm bad at both. <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/sad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Sad' />
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#96
I heard that in Japan, one of the primary reasons that people weren't interested in the PS3 as a blu-ray player was because it didn't have a DVR (which apparently other blu-ray players have?)... which would explain why it's selling well.



The dumb part about that is, well, why do you need a blu-ray player to record TV shows? It's not like they'll suddenly appear in 1080p just because you recorded them on a blu-ray player. Then again, people spend $90 on HDMI cables because they're told the quality is better =\



Been playing Heavy Rain, Dante's Inferno, and Darksiders. I play about 1 chapter of Heavy Rain per night because the fiancee likes watching the story, but we generally play around her bedtime, so she falls asleep after about 20 minutes or so <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laughlong.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':laugh2:' /> . Darksiders was fun enough, but it's basically an amalgamation of every action adventure game you've ever played, wrapped in a Blizzard-esque art style (it's actually drawn by the famous comic artist Joe Madureira, whose style heavily influenced Blizzard in the first place, but he's late to the party on this one). It's decent, but I think I'm done playing. Dante's Inferno, well, almost succeeds at not offending me. Not quite, but almost.
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#97
So...what's with this new reality show on PSN where people compete to become a game tester? <img src='http://www.halvsie.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':blink:' />



And that's so nice that your fiancee likes to watch you play Hapacheese! You really are a yin/yang couple!
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#98
[quote name='hapacheese' date='03 February 2010 - 02:35 PM' timestamp='1265222136' post='226699']

That's Sega/Tri-Ace's End of Eternity. The battle system is pretty ambitious - I believe you gain bonuses in battle the more "heroic" you behave. Essentially, the crazier the stuff that you try, the more awesome you have the potential of becoming (sorta like Bangai-o, in a sense, I guess). I don't know the nitty gritty on the actual mechanics, though.

[/quote]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVibNKrp8sQ

holy godddddd



ps: so when did video games start getting decent voice talent? I remember when the guy who voiced Solid Snake was one of the only good half-decent actors around.

pps: holy carp http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3JacLyZrMI I need this game
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#99
If you want good voice acting, you need to play Uncharted. Hands down some of the best game performances (not the deepest of stories, but between the acting and the animation, extremely believable).



Just finished Dante's Inferno and Heavy Rain. Here is my grading system - letter grade for creativity/innovation : numerical value for implementation. Meaning that a game with an A:90 would be extremely innovative with a very good implementation, a D:90 would be a highly derivative game that is still fun and well-designed, a C:70 would be a run-of-the-mill-why-did-I-bother-playing-this-because-I've-already-played-similar-games-a-hundred-times type of game.



Dante's Inferno: D:65



I gave it a 65 simply because the actual core mechanics (i.e. the button response time, animation systems, etc) are fairly solid. It's how it's all put together that brings it down significantly. The game is a COMPLETE ripoff of God of War and makes no attempt to hide this fact. Which is fine in and of itself. It wouldn't be an issue if the rest of the game made any sense at all.



Heavy Rain: A:75



Highly innovative. Compelling story. Great tech. Horribly designed. And there is one bit of the story that is hidden from you at a critical moment, only to later be revealed via flashback that nearly breaks the game fiction for me. But, I applaud their effort. You have to approach the game as an interactive story/movie where you play the characters, rather than a traditional video game. If you do that, it's much more interesting.
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[quote name='hapacheese' date='22 March 2010 - 11:31 AM' timestamp='1269286306' post='227118']

If you want good voice acting, you need to play Uncharted. Hands down some of the best game performances (not the deepest of stories, but between the acting and the animation, extremely believable).



Just finished Dante's Inferno and Heavy Rain. Here is my grading system - letter grade for creativity/innovation : numerical value for implementation. Meaning that a game with an A:90 would be extremely innovative with a very good implementation, a D:90 would be a highly derivative game that is still fun and well-designed, a C:70 would be a run-of-the-mill-why-did-I-bother-playing-this-because-I've-already-played-similar-games-a-hundred-times type of game.



Dante's Inferno: D:65



I gave it a 65 simply because the actual core mechanics (i.e. the button response time, animation systems, etc) are fairly solid. It's how it's all put together that brings it down significantly. The game is a COMPLETE ripoff of God of War and makes no attempt to hide this fact. Which is fine in and of itself. It wouldn't be an issue if the rest of the game made any sense at all.



Heavy Rain: A:75



Highly innovative. Compelling story. Great tech. Horribly designed. And there is one bit of the story that is hidden from you at a critical moment, only to later be revealed via flashback that nearly breaks the game fiction for me. But, I applaud their effort. You have to approach the game as an interactive story/movie where you play the characters, rather than a traditional video game. If you do that, it's much more interesting.

[/quote]





what do you give bioshock 2?
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