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you're livin' in Japan?
#1
people,

got some cool do and dont with Japanese for new comer there ?
ain't nervous then new culture shock [Image: whistling.gif]
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#2
Take your shoes off when going in the house, and take your slippers off when going in to a room with tatami.
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#3
<!--quoteo(post=185729:date=Jun 13 2007, 12:00 AM:name=Tadashi)-->QUOTE(Tadashi @ Jun 13 2007, 12:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Take your shoes off when going in the house, and take your slippers off when going in to a room with tatami.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

hmm..are they gonna give me shoes-house?
by the way,any short explain what tatami is? guess its not kimono
tx anyway
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#4
Are who going to give you a shoes house? I guess most people have some sort of cupboard or shelf where you can put your shoes, otherwise you can just leave them on the floor at the entrance.

A lot of Japanese people have a room in their house where the floor is covered with tatami mats, mats made out of bamboo. You are supposed to take off your slippers before walking on them.

[Image: tatami.JPG]
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#5
[quote name='Tadashi' date='Jun 13 2007, 12:10 AM' post='185732']
A lot of Japanese people have a room in their house where the floor is covered with tatami mats, mats made out of bamboo. You are supposed to take off your slippers before walking on them.

great!! clear sir!! tx
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#6
Don't ever stick your chopsticks into your rice perpendicular to the table, don't pass food from chopstick to chopstick, if something is offered to you as a gift you should turn it down a few times before accepting it (in polite company - amongst friends, it doesn't really matter).

There's a ton more, but those are the ones that floated to the top of my mind!
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#7
if someone invites you to their house, bring something little like flowers or cake. (> is this just a universal thing?)
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#8
Just a quick explanation as to why you don't stick chopstick (or any food utensil) perpendicular into food (or specifically rice) or pass food from chopstick to chopstick:

Japanese people are very particular about things that symbolize death or suffering, and basically these are things you do at a funeral. At a Japanese funeral, people use chopsticks to pass the bones of the deseased to other loved ones, who then place it into an urn. They are passed from chopstick to chopstick.

Also, at a Japanese funeral, food is offered to the dead, and rice will usually have a chopstick stuck perpendicular in it. So you don't want to do this at a dinner table. Its like telling a person that they will die.

Also in western cultures, the unlucky number may be 13, but in Japan the bad numbers are 4 and 9. 4 in Japanese is pronounced "shi", which also means "death" and 9 is pronounced "ku" which is short for "kurou" which means "suffering". In Japanese pubs "izakayas", you usually store you shoes in numbered compartments. You'll notice that the numbers 4 and 9 are always open whereas the numbers 3, 5, and 7 (which are good luck numbers) are the first to be taken. [Image: smartass.gif]
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#9
<!--quoteo(post=185760:date=Jun 13 2007, 08:51 AM:name=MiraiZ)-->QUOTE(MiraiZ @ Jun 13 2007, 08:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Just a quick explanation why you don't stick chopstick (or any food utensil) perpendicular into food (or specifically rice) or pass food from chopstick to chopstick:

Japanese people are very particular about things that symbolize death or suffering, and basically these are things you do at a funeral. At a Japanese funeral, people use chopsticks to pass the bones of the deseased to other loved ones, who then place it into an urn. They are passed from chopstick to chopstick.

Also, at a Japanese funeral, food is offered to the dead, and rice will usually have a chopstick stuck perpendicular in it. So you don't want to do this at a dinner table. Its like telling a person that they will die.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->[Image: idea.gif] I knew that you aren't supposed to stick your chopstick perpendicular into rice, but I didn't know why...

<!--quoteo-->QUOTE<!--quotec-->Also in western cultures, the unlucky number may be 13, but in Japan the bad numbers are 4 and 9. 4 in Japanese is pronounced "shi", which also means "death" and 9 is pronounced "ku" which is short for "kurou" which means "suffering".<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd--> Didn't know that about 9 either...

You shouldn't blow your nose loudly in front of other people... And it's inpolite if a woman sits cross-legged in front of other people besides family and good friends.
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#10
<!--quoteo(post=185765:date=Jun 13 2007, 09:07 AM:name=miel)-->QUOTE(miel @ Jun 13 2007, 09:07 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->You shouldn't blow your nose loudly in front of other people... And it's inpolite if a woman sits cross-legged in front of other people besides family and good friends.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

wow es ist sicher total dagegen mit unserem kultur hier oder?
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#11
Das stimmt... (That's right - that Japanese culture is quite different) My mum is Japanese and I've been to Japan many times, but every time I go there, I get to know something I didn't know before. What kind of experience did you make when you went to Japan?
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#12
From my personal experience, I'd say make sure you're familiar with Japanese style toilets and how to use them before you're desperate for one! It's actually quite sensible in the end. You just straddle and squat. It's a little uncomfortable, but much more hygienic than western toilets!
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#13
<!--quoteo(post=185801:date=Jun 13 2007, 11:35 AM:name=Global Nomad)-->QUOTE(Global Nomad @ Jun 13 2007, 11:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->From my personal experience, I'd say make sure you're familiar with Japanese style toilets and how to use them before you're desperate for one! It's actually quite sensible in the end. You just straddle and squat. It's a little uncomfortable, but much more hygienic than western toilets!<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->


Haha - good advice! My stepdad has a bad back and got stuck using a Japanese-style toilet. He ended up having to grab onto the dome in front to keep his balance. Nasty.
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#14
<!--quoteo(post=185779:date=Jun 13 2007, 12:27 PM:name=miel)-->QUOTE(miel @ Jun 13 2007, 12:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->What kind of experience did you make when you went to Japan?<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

i was in electronic city and asked for a note-book in English-OS. the young guy said that they didnt have it.
he was really sorry about that by bending down his body like 30 degree and i knew he really meant it from his sorry face.
i said no problem to him. but he did the same thing again so i said no problem again to him..but hey! he repeated again and again
and i didnt want to be rude by leaving him since he still saying sorry to me..until my husband came to me and pull me to go..funny, coz then i was the one who felt bad [Image: biggrin.gif]
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#15
^Hahaha.. sales clerk guilt trip.
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#16
<!--quoteo(post=185729:date=Jun 13 2007, 07:00 AM:name=Tadashi)-->QUOTE(Tadashi @ Jun 13 2007, 07:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->Take your shoes off when going in the house, and take your slippers off when going in to a room with tatami.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Don't forget to remove the toilet slippers after you're done in the toilet. Common problem even if you're aware that you're not supposed to walk around the house in the toilet slippers [Image: rolleyes.gif]
Make every moment count!
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#17
^I was kinda stumped at the toilet slippers when I was at my cousins house for the first time. It's just a very small room with a toilet for f*cks sake! [Image: wtf.gif] It's not like your going to be walking around anywhere. You just step into the slippers, close the door, turn 180degrees and sit down on the toilet. And there's a fluffy floormat that covers the halfmeter of space between the toilet and the door. Are the special toilet slippers really neccesary? [Image: eh.gif]
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#18
I guess Japanese men don't have very good aim [Image: giggle2.gif]
Make every moment count!
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#19
^
[Image: laughlong.gif] I'd just about forgotten about toilet slippers...

Speaking of slippers...if you're going to a public place with slippers (schools, some hospitals/dentists, ryokan - traditional Japanese style hotels etc. etc.), I'd recommend wearing socks, as you have absolutely no idea who's been wearing those slippers before you. I HATE those (usually plastic or faux-leather) slippers - it's so unhygenic - I doubt they ever get cleaned, and god only knows what vile foot disease the previous wearer might've had. Or maybe I'm just uber-sensitive. But I don't like the idea. [Image: no.gif]

Japanese style toilets may be hygenic in the sense that there's no skin contact, but the ones in stations or parks never get cleaned properly - so they STINK [Image: yuk.gif] . Horrendously. People often miss those things, and I think they only hose'em down (no bleach or anything), so there's years of encrusted pee, poop and vomit on the tiles around the things. I avoid them at all costs unless I'm DESPERATE...and ladies in particular - don't forget to take your own little packet of tissue paper (often handed out for free as advertisements) as your average public toilet quite often is devoid of paper.

Also - most Japanese toilets don't provide paper towels/hand dryers, so make sure you take your own handkerchief to dry your hands.
[color="#9ACD32"]Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

[/color]
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#20
<!--quoteo(post=185833:date=Jun 14 2007, 12:46 AM:name=chiquita)-->QUOTE(chiquita @ Jun 14 2007, 12:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}><!--quotec-->^

Speaking of slippers...if you're going to a public place with slippers (schools, some hospitals/dentists, ryokan - traditional Japanese style hotels etc. etc.), I'd recommend wearing socks, as you have absolutely no idea who's been wearing those slippers before you.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->


Right, that's what i asked Tadashi as well. Are the hospitalizer(either their house with or without tatami) will give us shoes-house(you guys call it slipper)??
so yeah, guess socks/slippers would be in my bag.but i hope its okay for them,huh?
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