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Difference between Kanto and Kansai?
#21
I'm from Sapporo but Iived in Tokyo for a while. People are different everywhere and most people who live in Tokyo aren't even from there anyway.

I don't think it's necessary to say people from one place are somehow intrinsically better than another and as for your family saying things like people are cold and the food is shit...Well, that's just prejudice, plain and simple. I knew a woman slightly that said the same sort of crap about people from Osaka but that they were money-grubbing and inelegant. I was just like "don't wanna hear it lady."

I realise that in some situations stereotypes can be a useful way to deal with the world, and people, but I found many warm, helpful and funny people in Tokyo. It's true that I didn't find anyone as hilarious as say, some Kiwis I know but funny isn't the only thing I find important. I definitely had some pretty hilarious interactions with Japanese people I didn't know though, and did some good dancing with strangers in clubs for example which doesn't seem that reserved to me.

Perhaps if you expect people to behave a certain way they do: it's like a self-fulfilling prophecy.
[url="http://sasasunakku.com"]Sasasunakku[/url]
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#22
mmm sasa is right...
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#23
Interesting topic! From experience of living all around Japan, I do agree that Tokyo people seem to be cold and self-serving. But having said this, most of the people who live in Tokyo aren't really from Tokyo; they're from other regions. I think that it's an environmental factor, where most people who live here are professionals and tend to be under constant stress from life in the city. I know that this certainly applies to me. I don't think of myself as being cold and self-serving but I have been accused of it on several occasions.



I think the warmest and most hospitable people are up in the north. I use to work in Sendai when I first moved to Japan, and I found that the people up in Miyagi we're especially nice to me. Since its kind of "inaka", the foreign presence is still somewhat low, and so there is a lot of curiosity and interest of foreign culture and people, whereas in Tokyo, there are so many foreigners that people don't really care about your culture or where you're from. You're just another American, or Brit, or Indian etc..in a vast sea of foreigners. It really kind of makes me miss the old days in Tokyo when I use to turn heads just by walking down the street (not that I am an attention whore or anything), but it kind of felt nice to be noticed.
I'm not a real actor, but I play one on TV.
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#24
[quote name='MiraiZ' timestamp='1319792757' post='231072']

...most of the people who live in Tokyo aren't really from Tokyo; they're from other regions. I think that it's an environmental factor, where most people who live here are professionals and tend to be under constant stress from life in the city."

[/quote]

I agree with this as most of the people here in LA aren't originally from the area, yet they tend to share the same "bad" characteristics that LA people are known for such as being shallow and superficial. I definitely think it's an environmental thing where like-minded people gather in the same area for a particular reason (professionals to Tokyo to make it rich, budding actors to Hollywood to become famous, etc.), but of course there's always plenty of exceptions to the rule.



Having said that, most of my time in Japan has been in Tokyo, but what little time I spent in Osaka I definitely got the impression that the people in Kansai are warmer to strangers as a whole.
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